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Full text of "Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society"

MA?SrtCHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 




J947 Tfem 0W 

Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 



PRICE FIFTY CENTS 



Hs 



V -•< 



aH4zi 
Oxhihitions in 1947 . 



January 23-24 
March 10-15 

May 5-6 
May 15-16 
June 5-6 
June 17-18 
June 27-28 
July 9-10 
August 21-22 
August 27-28 

September 5-6 
October 9-10-11 

November 6-7-8-9 



Camellia Show 

Spring Flower Show 
(In Mechanics Building) 

Daffodil Show 

Tulip Show 

Iris Show 

June Exhibition 

Delphinium Show 

Lily Show 

Cladiolus Exhibition 

Exhibition of the Products 
of Children's Gardens 

House Plant Show 

Exhibition of Fruits, 

Vegetables and Flowers 

Autumn Flower Show 



ig47 Tear "Book 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 



^l>n.nnual i\eports for IQ46 

and a J[\st of 

Hooks Z^idded to the J^ihrary 



Foreword 

The Committee on Lectures and Publications has 
the honor to present herewith the twenty-fourth num- 
ber of the Society's Year Book, with which are com- 
bined the annual reports for the year 1946. 

William P. Wolcott, Chairman. 

Boston, Mass. 
June 1, 1947 




Professor Ray M. Koon 

Elected trustee at the annual meeting. May 5, 1947 



CONTENTS 

Officers for 1947 5 

Committees for 1947 7 

Med-als and Certificates Awarded in 1946 8 

Garden Committee Awards 13 

Special Medal Awards 17 

Books Added to the Library 

Between May 1, 1946 and May 1, 1947 23 

Benevolent Fruit and Flower Mission Report 31 

Annual Meeting; May 5, 1947 33 

The President's Address 33 

The Secretary's Report 37 

Exhibitions Committee Report 41 

Committee on Prizes Report 44 

Committee on the Exhibitions of the Products 

of Children's Gardens Report 46 

Library Committee Report 48 

The Treasurer's Report 49 

Resuh of the Balloting 50 

William N. Craig 51 

Necrology 52 

Honorary Members 53 

Corresponding Members 54 

An Increased Endowment 55 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 57 




Arno H. Nehrling 

Appointed executive secretary, January 1, 1947 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 
SOCIETY 



President 

JOHN S. AMES 

Vice-Presidents 

Aubrey B. Butler 
Dr. George 0. Clark 

Trustees 

*JoHN S. Ames Harlan P. Kelsey (1948) 

* Aubrey B. Butler R\y M. Koon (1950) 
George W. Butterworth (1949) George Lewis, Jr. (1949) 
Stedman Buttrick (1948) Q. A. Shaw McKean (1949) 

*Dr. George 0. Clark Elmer D. Merrill (1950) 

Mrs. John Gardner Coolidge (1949) Mrs. William A. Parker (1948) 
Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby (1949) Harold S. Ross (1950) 

Samuel J. Goddard (1950) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1948) 

Ernest Hoftyzer (1950) *Edwin S. Webster 

* Walter Hunnewell William P. Wolcott (1948) 

Honorary Trustee 

Oakes Ames 

Treasurer 

Walter Hunnewell 

Assistant Treasurer 

George Lewis, Jr. 

Secretary 

Arno H. Nehrling 



•Members ex-officio. Dates given are those of expiration of terms. 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 
For the Year Ending May 3, 1948 

Executive Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 
AUBREY B. BUTLER WALTER HUNNEWELL 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Finance Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chalrmaai 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK WALTER HUNNEWELL 

Budgret Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman , „„ 

AUBREY B. BUTLER DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK WALTER HUNNEWELL 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Membership Committee 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH, Chairman _ ,, „^«„ 

ERNEST HOFTYZER R-A.Y M. KOON 

Committee on Exhibitions 

ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman _ . „,,„„ 

SAMUEL J. GODDARD MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

RAY M. KOON HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Conunittee on Prizes 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK, Chairman _.„, „ T,™»,vt 

ERNEST BOROWSKI Q. A. SHAW McKEAN 

JOHN ELLIS HAROLD E. WHITE 

Committee on Library 

ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman ^,,„^,™«. 

MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY MRS. SUSAN McKELVEY 

GEORGE LEWIS, JR. MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 

ERNEST HOFTYZER, Chairman _ „^^^ ^«mm 

RAY M. KOON WILLIAM P. WOLCOTT 

Committee on Special Medals 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman ^^ _ ^,^, ___ 

AUBREY B. BUTLER HARLAN P. KELSEY 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK ELMER D. MERRILL 

Committee on Gardens 

GEORGE LEWIS, JR., Chairman _ „xT,.T^T,n^rcT t 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH WALTER HUNNEWELL 

MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Building 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman , _ ^^^ «,^,T,m 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK WILLIAM P. WOLCOTT 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

SAMUEL J. GODDARD, Chairman _^^^ ^ mxTT^rto 

DANIEL W. O'BRIEN MRS. HENKY D. TUDOR 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman ^ ^ «««TTn>/-.w 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. MRS. JOHN G. COOLTOGE 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK ELMER D. MERRILL 

Nominating Conmiittee 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY 

MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 

Q. A. SHAW McKEAN 



Medals and Certificates 
Awarded in 1946 



The Albert C. Burr age Gold Vase 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., North Abington, for the most outstanding exhibit in 
1946. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, former director of the Arnold Arboretum, for eminent 
service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Thomas H. Everett of the New York Botanical Garden, for skill in horticulture. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 

Miss Isabella Preston, Dominion Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, for dis- 
tinguished success in the breeding of new w^oody plants, particularly lilacs 
and crab apples. 

H. H. Hunnewell Medal 

Mrs. R. Boyer-Miller, for her estate in Wenham. 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Dr. A, F. Blakeslee, Smith College, Northampton, for his work as a plant breeder 
and particularly for his research in the use of Colchicine in plant breeding 
started at the Carnegie Institute. 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

James J. Hurley, superintendent for Mrs. Robert Treat Paine, 2nd, for skill in 
horticulture. 

Silver Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. Arthur Adams, for her estate in Dover. 

Silver Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. William Stuart Forbes for their estate in Hamilton. 

Bronze Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellery Sedgwuck for their estate in "Wenham. 

President's Cup 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., North Abington, for a memorial garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the Horticultural Society of New York 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, North Easton, for a Chinese garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for an informal exhibit of acacias at the Spring 
Show. 

8 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES — CONTINUED 9 

The George Holliday Memorial Prize 

William Todd, North Uxbridge, for a group of flowering and foliage plants at 
the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Garden Clubs' Exhibitions Committee for a suburban house and garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Trophy of the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., Salem, for a group of amaryllis at the Spring 
Show. 

Sarah Todd Bulkley Gold Medal of the Garden Club of America 

F. I. Carter & Sons, Tewksbury, for a garden of cacti and succulents at the 
Spring Show. 

Book: Berlese's "Monography of the Genus Camellia" 

John B. Wills, Winchester, for the camellia alba-plena, best bloom in the Show. 

Crystal Vases 

Harold S. Ross, Hingham, for the tulip Alberio Triumph, best bloom in the 

Show. 
Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for the daffodil Chastity, best bloom in the 

Show. 

New England Gladiolus Society 27th Anniversary Prize 

An illuminated scroll awarded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society to 
Wendell W. Wyman, Sharon, for 25 spikes of the gladiolus Deborah Sampson. 

Gold Medals 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, for a Chinese garden at the Spring Show. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for a Memorial garden at the Spring Show. 

Boston School of Flower Arrangement (Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director), for 

holiday decorations for the home. 
Breck's, for a lily garden. 

Breck's, for a border of garden chrysanthemums. 
Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias. 
Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of gardenias. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for a garden of cacti and succulents at the Spring Show. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for the general effect of combined peony exhibits. 
Dr. George 0. Clark, for a display of clematis. 
Flying Cloud Farms, Inc., for a display of gladiolus. 
Frost & Higgins Company, for a garden of 1870 at the Spring Show. 
Garden Clubs' Exhibitions Committee, for a suburban house and garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, for flower arrangements at the Spring 

Show. 
Alexander Irving Heimlich, for a display of snapdragons at the Spring Show. 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., Kelsey -Highlands Nursery, for a wild garden featuring 

dicentra eximia alba, at the Spring Show. 
Lexington Nurseries, Inc., for a garden featuring annuals at the Spring Show. 
New England Carnation Growers Association, for a display of carnations at the 

Spring Show. 
Roses, Incorporated, for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 
Zenon Schreiber (at New York), for a rock garden. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for an informal exhibit of acacias at the Spring 

Show. 



10 MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES CONTINUED 

William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 

Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Rocco Zeparo, for a display of camellias. 

Silver Medals 

Benson & Young, Inc., for a display of snapdragons at the Spring Show. 
Boston School Gardens — Woburn, for best collection of vegetables and flowers 

from a school garden. 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 
Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

Breck's, for a formal garden of tuberous-rooted begonias. 
William 0. Causer, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Champlain View Gardens, Burlington, Vermont, for a collection of gladiolus. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show, 
Copley Plaza Flower Shop (Miss Elynor O'Neil), for the story of a woman's 

life told with roses at the Spring Show. 
Sherman W. Eddy, Avon, Connecticut, for a garden of 1870 at the Spring 

Show. 
Thomas L. Gavin, for an exhibit of dahlias. 

Garden -in-the-Woods (Will C. Curtis), for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Garden-in-the-Woods (Will C. Curtis), for a naturalistic exhibit at the Spring 

Show. 
Garden-in-the-Woods (Will C. Curtis), for a display of woody plants. 
Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for a display of perennials. 
G. Peabody Gardner, for a display of camellias. 
Garrepy's Greenhouses, for a begonia garden. 
Greene Herb Gardens, Greene, Rhode Island, for a kitchen herb garden at 

the Spring Show. 
Mrs. J. Norman Henry, Gladwyne, Pennsylvania, for plants of lilium phUa- 

delphicum showing color variations. 
Jamaica Plain High School, for a collection of flower show posters at the 

Spring Show. 
New England Herb Producer's Association, for an educational herb exhibit 

at the Spring Show. 
New England Rose Society, for a display of roses. 

Oregon Bulb Farms, Sandy, Oregon, for a display of L. davidii. Green Moun- 
tain, and centifolium hybrids. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dana Osgood, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, for a display of 

camellias. 
Mrs. Robert Treat Paine, 2nd, for a display of chr>'santhemums. 
Parker, The Florist, for holiday arrangements of roses at the Spring Show. 
John L. Russell, for an exhibit of daffodils. 
Sandyloam (Alan and Esther MacNeil), North Springfield, Vermont, for an 

educational exhibit of lily bulbs at the Spring Show. 
Seabrook Nurseries, Seabrook, New Hampshire, for a display of gladiolus. 
Van's Nursery and Landscape Service, for a rhododendron and azalea garden 

at the Spring Show. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids. 
Edwin S. Webster, for Winter-flowering begonia plants. 

Bronze Medals 

Abington Strawberry Nursery (G. H. Rounds), for a display of strawberries. 
Bennett School — Brighton, for a collection of flowers and vegetables from a 
school garden. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES — CONTINUED 11 

Boston Mycological Club, for an educational exhibit of fungi at the Spring 

Show. 
James J. Hurley, for an exhibit of Nerine fothergilli. 
Dr. B. E. Lovesey, for an educational display of gladiolus. 
The Merrys, for a collection of daffodils. 
Mrs. R. W. Sayles, for a display of daffodils. 
H. Stanton, for herbs and scented geraniums at the Spring Show. 

First Class Certificates 

Clematis Glamour, exhibited by Dr. George 0. Clark. 

Cymbidium Elizabeth Burxage Draper, exhibited by Orchidvale. 

Dahlia Felsemere Beauty, exhibited by Martin Gilmore. 

Sinclair's new variegated ivy, exhibited by George Sinclair. 

Lilium maximowiczii wadai x L. daurieum wilsonii, exhibited by Ec^ar L. 

Kline. 
Potinara Evelyn Harris (SjL.C. Vulcan X B.C. Mrs. Robert Paterson), exhibited 

by Edwin S. Webster. 

Awards of Merit 

Carnation Olympic, exhibited by Littlefield-Wyman Nurseries. 

Carnation Sidney Littlefield, exhibited by Littlefield-Wyman Nurseries. 

Chrysanthemum Anne Lawrence, exhibited by Alex Gumming. 

Chrysanthemum Margaret Moeller, exhibited by Waltham Field Station. 

Clematis Nona, exhibited by Dr. George 0. Clark. 

Cymbidium Baldur var. Bronze King, exhibited by John S. Ames. 

Daffodil E. H. Wilson, exhibited by Breck*s. 

Lilium concolor racemosa, exhibited by F. L. Skinner. 

Lilium davidii Dr. Abel, exhibited by the Oregon Bulb Farms, Inc. 

Estate Lily, exhibited by MoHutchinson & Company. 

Lilium philadelphicum showing color variations, exhibited by Mrs. J. Norman 

Henry. 
Lilium Thunbergianum Dr. George Clark, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 
Snapdragon May Lothrop, exhibited by C. H. Lothrop. 
Tulipa Praestans, Pamir, exhibited by Harold S. Ross. 
Mendel Tulip — Van der Eerde, exhibited by Harold S. Ross. 

Votes of Commendation 

Carnation Olympic, exhibited by Littlefield-Wyman Nurseries. 

Gladiolus Alice Ayer, exhibited by Luther P. Benedict. 

Gladiolus Canopus, exhibited by Stephen Chase. 

Gladiolus Display (The Life of a Gladiolus), exhibited by Mrs. Harvey L. 

Stone. 
Gladiolus Hall's Apricot, exhibited by Lt. Col. G. M. Churcher. 
Gladiolus Kuhn originations, exhibited by Chester F. and Dorothea J. Kuhn. 
New Holland Gladiolus, exhibited by Carl A. Hall. 
Gladiolus Pink Frills, exhibited by Lt. Col. G. M. Churcher. 
Gladiolus Spindthrift, exhibited by Stephen Chase. 
Gladiolus displayed in Wishing Well, exhibited by George J. Moore. 
Lilium Barbara, exhibited by William Crosby Horsford. 
Bush Buttercup squash, exhibited by Colprit's Nursery and Seed Farm. 
Single early tulips Sunburst, Mme. Gevers and Miss Grayson, exhibited by 

Harold S. Ross. 

Cultural Certificates 

Mrs. G. William Anderson, for a display of vegetables. 
Peter Arnott, for Winter-flowering begonia plants. 
Peter Arnott, for a group of chrysanthemums. 



12 MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES — CONTINUED 

Peter Arnott, for specimen bush form chrysanthemums. 

Peter Arnott, for a display of daffodils. 

Benson & Young, Inc., for Arctotis grandis (Blue African Daisy). 

Ernest Borowski, for geranium Barbara Hope. >, 

Breck's, for garden chrysanthemums. 

Butler & UUman, Inc., for Hadley gardenias. 

William 0. Causer, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for camellia semi-double blush. 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for a display of clematis. 

Thomas L. Galvin, for an exhibit of dahlias. 

Alexander Irving Heimlich, for a display of snapdragons. 

James J. Hurley, for Nerine fothergilli. 

Oregon Bulb Farms, Inc., for collection of Green Mountain and centifolium 

hybrids. 
George Palmer, for begonia Turford Hall. 
George Palmer, for an exhibit of freesias. 
Harold S. Ross, for Tulipa chrysantha. 
Pasquale Vasaturo, for a display of gladiolus. 
WiUiam T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a group of amaryUis. 



Vote of Thanks 

Archie A. Ashley, for wax snap beans. 

P. Barrett, for gladiolus seedlings. 

Simon Benne & Company, for gladiolus — New Holland varieties. 

Mrs. Georgianna Billingsley, for an arrangement of tuberous begonias. 

Mrs. Georgianna Billingsley, for an arrangement of Autumn crocus. 

Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a display of camellias. 

Copley Plaza Flower Shop (Miss Elynor O'Neil), for flower hats. 

Mrs. Helen L. Cotter, for an Easter lily. 

S. L. Davenport, for seedling grapes. 

Mrs. John Davis, for a dracaena plant. 

Charles R. Dewey, for wild flowers. 

George W. Dickey, for water lilies. 

Warren H. Dowling, for new gladiolus "Abnaki". 

Florists Telegraph Delivery Association (Boston Unit), for a display of 

carnations. 
Garden-in-the-Woods (Will C. Curtis), for an arrangement of lilies. 
Mrs. Charles H. Haddrell, for Fantasy — ^parrot tulip. 
Mrs. Charles H. Haddrell, for Sirene — cottage tulip. 
William J. Hurley, for a Christmas garland. 
Miss Isabel A. Johnston, for an arrangement of perennials. 
Sydney G. Kimpton, for camellias in variety. 
Sydney G. Kimpton, for single camellias. 
Lincoln School — ^Brookline, for house plants. 
New England Carnation Growers Association, for an arrangement of carnations 

in a living-room. 
Perrine-Scott Farms, for gladiolus seedlings. 
Harold S. Ross, for Molucella laevis (Bells of Ireland). 
John D. Runkle School (Grade V) — -Brookline, for a model of a lighthouse 

garden. 
John L. Russell, for a display of tulips. 

Dr. K. W. Thompson, for Euphorbia splendens (Crown of Thorns). 
Mrs. George G. Whitney, for an arrangement of dried material. 
Mrs. W. S. Williams, for Lycoris squamigera (Sununer amaryllis). 
John B. Wills, for the camellia alba-plena. 

John B. Wills, for the camellia Professor Charles Sprague Sargent. 
J. B. Witherby, for a seedling pear. 
Yoder Brothers, for a collection of new chrysanthemum varieties. 



Garden Committee Awards 



The Board of Trustees have awarded the following medals on the 
recommendation of the Committee on Gardens: 

The Hunnewell Medal to Mrs. R. Boyer-Miller for (her estate in 
Wenham, which is an exclusive one, attractively landscaped, with 
many trees and shrubs. The grounds, which are on a hillside, are 
terraced on three levels, the supporting walls being planted witlb 
appropriate rock plants. The committee noted with approval the 
skilful manner in which the formal part of the estate has been made 
to blend into the informal section, which contains great numbers 
of kalmias and other shrubs. As a matter of interest, this estate 
has been brought to its present state of excellence in a relatively 
brief period of fifteen years. 

A Silver Medal to Mrs. Arthur Adams for her estate in Dover, 
which has many interesting features, including a charming woodsy 
walk around a pond, where native shrubs and trees have been planted 
with excellent taste. An unusual feature of the estate which greatly 
interested the committee was a large fruit garden completely sur- 
rounded by apple and pear trees trained on wires, in both espalier 
and fan-shaped form, the trees being well covered with fruit, at 
the time of the committee's visit. 

A Silver Medal to Mr. and Mrs. William Stuart Forbes for their 
estate in Hamilton, where the house and garden have been tied to- 
gether with exceptional skill, an intimate effect being obtained such 
as is seldom seen. A green house with a pool is just below the eye 
as one looks from the living room window, and close by is a rose 
garden and a well-placed hei^b garden. Looking across the green 
garden, several fine old trees are seen. 

A Bronze Medal to Mr. and Mrs. EUery Sedgwick for their estate 
in Wenham, which was found interesting and distinctive because of 
the great variety in planting material which it contains, especially 
as regards woody plants. The place has a large number of orna- 
mental cherries and many trees which have a weeping habit and 
which are well grown. This is a place of particular horticultural 
interest, with a great many plants, some of them not too common, 
which have been assembled by the owners over a series of years. 

George Lewis, Jr., Chairman 



13 




Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill 

Awarded the George Robert White Medal of Honor 



Special Medal Awards 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees on January 7, 1947, several 
medals were awarded on the recommendation of the Special Medals 
Committee, Mr. Harold S. Ross, Chairman. 

The GEORGE ROBERT WHITE MEDAL OF HONOR for service 
to horticulture was awarded to Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, former 
director of the Arnold Arboretum. 

Dr. Merrill's career in botany began at the University of Maine, 
where he received his B.S. degree in 1898, his M.S. in 1904, and 
an honorary Sc.D. in 1925. Harvard University also conferred an 
honorary Sc.D. and the University of California an LL.D. in 1936. 

His unequalled reputation as a specialist on the botany of the 
Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia began in 1902, when he went 
to Manila as Botanist of the Bureau of Agriculture and the Bureau 
of Forestry. He became in succession Professor of Botany and head 
of the Department of Botany in the University of the Philippines, 
and Director of the Bureau of Science. In addition to administra- 
tive work in building up these young institutions, he wrote many 
papers on the botany of north China, the Philippines, Malaysia and 
Polynesia, and described 3000 new species of plants. 

A new phase of his career was begun in 1923, when he became 
Dean of the College of Agriculture and Director of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station of the University of California. In 1930 he was 
called to New York as Professor of Botany at Columbia University 
and Director of the New York Botanical Garden, which two posts 
he held until 1935. In that year he was appointed Professor of 
Botany and Administrator of the Botanical Collections at Harvard 
University. Although he retired in 1946 as Administrator, he con- 
tinues to hold his appointment as Professor of Botany at Harvard. 

Dr. Merrill is the author of more than 400 papers on the botany 
of north China, the Philippines, Malaysia and Polynesia, and is a 
member of many scientific and learned societies in Asia, America, 
and Europe, including the Linnaean Society of London, from which 
he has a medal, and the Royal Swedish Society, of which he is the 
only American member. 

The THOMAS ROLAND MEDAL for skill in horticulture was 
awarded to Thomas H. Everett. He is not only a finished garden 
craftsman but also has the ability to train others in the art of garden- 
ing. Mr. Everett's own early training was acquired in British gardens 
culminating with his graduation from Kew in 1927. He came to the 
United States shortly thereafter and soon took charge of the H. E. 
Manville estate in Pleasantville, N. Y. While at the Manville estate 
he became well known for his exhibits of greenhouse plants at New 
York shows. From the beginning of his American experience, Mr. 
Everett established himself as a horticultural writer. During this 

17 



18 



RECIPIENTS OF SPECIAL MEDALS 




Thomas H. Everett 

burgh. Also, there have been the building 

Rock Garden and plant hunting trips in the 

The JACKSON DAWSON MEDAL 

and propagation of plants was awarded 
Until recently assistant in 
ornamental plant breeding 
in the Division of Horti- 
culture, Central Experi- 
mental Farm, Ottawa, 
Canada, Miss Preston was 
born in Preston, Lanca- 
shire, England, in which 
country she was trained 
in the best tradition of 
British gardening. 

Lily growers will thank 
Miss Preston for what 
she has done with their 
favorite flower, to men- 
tion only the so-caUed 
"stenographer" hybrids 
which have been displayed 
at recent shows. Miss 
Preston is the author of 
the recently published 
book entitled "Lilies for 
Every Garden," over the 
first edition which ap- 
peared in 1929. 



early period in this coun- 
try, he returned to Eng- 
land to receive the much 
coveted National Diploma 
in Horticulture from the 
Royal Horticultural Soci- 
ety: 

Appointed horticultur- 
ist at the New York Botan- 
ical Garden in 1932, Mr. 
Everett was given the job 
of revitalizing one of the 
country's great indoor 
plant collections. After 
that followed the establish- 
ment of a gardeners' train- 
ing program modeled after 
the Royal Botanical Gar- 
dens of Kew and Edin- 
of the Thompson Memorial 
search of American alpines. 

for skill in hybridization 
to Miss Isabella Preston. 




Miss Isabella Preston 



RECIPIENTS OF SPECIAL MEDALS 



19 



Another lengthy project which Jj|s turned out well and bears Miss 
Preston's name is Syringa prestonae which combines the two lilacs, 
S. villosa and S. reflexa. 

Miss Preston has also contributed to the development of roses 
having introduced such hardy bush varieties as Mohawk, Huron, 
Iroquois, and climbers such as Patricia Macoun and Langford. Iris 
growers are also familiar with her introductions of Siberian iris 
such as Canadian Rivers, Pembina, and Ottawa. 

A large GOLD MEDAL for research in plant breeding was 
awarded to Dr. Albert F. Blakeslee. At present a member of the 
Botany Department of Smith College, Dr. Blakeslee has, in the years 
since he was graduated from Wesleyan University and Harvard, 
carved out not one but 
several careers in botany. 
During that time he has 
been a staff member at 
Harvard and at the Uni- 
versity of Connecticut, 
was director of the Car- 
negie Station for Experi- 
mental Evolution and is 
now at Smith, still pur- 
suing the principles of 
plant genetics. 

One of Dr. Blakeslee's 
earliest contributions was 
as co-author with C. D. 
Jarvis of two publications 
on trees in Winter. These 
books are still much 
sought after. 

The much publicized 
technique of influencing 
plant heredity by apply- 
ing the drug cochicine 
to cause chromosome 
changes, was one of Dr. 
Blakeslee's innovations. 
Other contributions of 
Dr. Blakeslee to genetics 

are best known only to scientists interested in the fundamental life 
processes and the ways to control these processes. In the long run 
these fundamental investigations may prove the most practical. 
Farmers and gardeners will come to appreciate what Dr. Blakeslee 
was doing all those years that he was culturing a datura which to 
them is just a weed. 

Another investigation of great interest to gardeners was conducted 




Dr. Albert F. Blakeslee 



20 



RECIPIENTS OF SPECIAL MEDALS 



at a New York flower 
show some years ago when 
Dr. Blakeslee w as on hand 
to test the human sense 
of smell by asking vis- 
itors to sniff this and 
that carefully chosen 
flower and register their 
likes and dislikes or lack 
of anv sensation of either 
kind. 

A GOLD MEDAL for 
skill in horticulture was 
awarded to James J. Hur- 
ley. He has long displayed 
his skill in gardening at 
exhibitions of this Society. 
His displays for Mrs. 
Robert Treat Paine, \\. 
for whom he is head gar- 
dener, have been outstand- 
ing. Mr. Hurley has also 
been a very active mem- 
ber of the Gardeners and 
Florists Club of Boston 
for nearly 40 years. He 

has held many offices in that organization during that time and 

participated in all its activities. 




James J. Hurley 



Books Added to the Library 

A List of Accessions Made Between 
May 1, 1946 and May 1, 1947 

This list is so arranged as to serve as a supplement to 
the catalogue. Members are urged to make use of it. 

Library Accessions 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Bralliar, F. B. The southern gardener. 1946 

Dallimore, W. The pruning of trees and shrubs, being a description 
of the methods practiced in the Royal botanic gardens, Kew. 1945 
Farnham, R. B., ed. Grounds for living. 1946 
Findlay, H. Gardening for health and happiness. 1946 
Home Garden. 500 common garden mistakes corrected. 1945 
Hottes, A. C. Plant propagation; 2d ed. 1940 

Calendars 

Dempsey, P. W. A year in my garden. 1938 
Jenkins, D. H. Around the garden. 1947 

Wilson, H. V. P. 1947 garden calendar, day by day record of engage- 
ments. 1946 

History 

Geiser, S. W. Horticulture and horticulturists in early Texas. 1945 

AUXmiARY SCIENCES 

Soil Science 

Bennett, H. H. Elements of soil conservation. 1947 
Bruce, M. E. Common-sense compost making. 1946 
Darwin, C. Darwin on humus and the earthworm; intro. by Sir 

Albert Howard. 1945 
Hopkins, D. P. Chemicals, humus and the soil. 1945 
Howard, Sir A. The soil and health, a study of organic agriculture. 

1947 
Laurie, A. Soils and fertilizers for greenhouse and garden. 1946 
Mickey, K. B. Health from the ground up. 1946 
Mickey, K. B. Man and the soil, a brief introduction to the study of 

soilconservation. 1945 
Millar, C. E. and Turk, L. M. Fundamentals of soil science. 1943 
Pfeiffer, E. Practical guide to the use of bio-dynamic preparations; 

new and enl. ed. 1945 

23 



24 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Shewell-Cooper, W. E. Soil humus and health. 1944 
Spurway, C. H. Soil testing, a practical system of soil diagnosis. 1935 
Worthen. E. L. Farm soils, their management and fertilization; 3d ed. 
1941 

Diseases and Insects 

Ferris, G. F. Atlas of scale insects, series 4. 1942 

Forsberg, J. L. Diseases of ornamental plants. 1946 

Horsfall, J. G. Fungicides and their action. 1946 

McClintock, J. A. and Fisher, W. B. Spray chemicals and application 

equipment. 1945 
Smith, R. C. Common insects of Kansas. 1943 
Westcott, C. The gardener's bug book. 1946 

Weeds 

Canada. Dept. of agriculture. Seed branch. Weeds and weed seeds 

illustrated and described, with notes on seed cleaning. 1935 
Robbins, W. W. Weeds of California. 1941 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 

Mitchell, S. B. Your California garden and mine. 1947 
Wilkinson, A. E. Encyclopedia of trees, shrubs, vines and lawns for 
the home garden. 1946 

Greenhouse and House Plants 

Chabot, E. Greenhouse gardening for everyone. 1946 

Free, M. All about house plants. 1946 

Goldsmith, M. 0. Picture primer of indoor gardening. 1946 

Taylor. H. V. and Johnson, K. H. Commercial flower production. 

1936-1939 
Wright, W. J. Greenhouses, their construction and equipment; rev. 

ed. 1946 

Monographs 

American rhododendron society. Rhododendron yearbook. 1945 

Boyle, L. M. Orchid town is America's foremost Cymbidium orchid 
grower. 1946 

British carnation society. How to grow perpetual-flowering carna- 
tions. 1940 

Haselton, S. E. Cacti for the amateur. 1938 

Haselton, S. E. Epiphyllum handbook. 1946 

Haselton, S. E. Succulents for the amateur. 1946 

Hume, H. H. Camellias in America. 1946 

Kumlien, L. L. The friendly evergreens. 1946 

Laurie, A. Garden and greenhouse chrysanthemums. 1946 

McNeil, A. and E. Garden lilies. 1946 

Mansfield, T. C. Alpines in colour and cultivation. 1946 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 25 

Portland, Ore., chrysanthemum society. Chrysanthemums, how we 
grow them out of doors; 2d ed. 1946 

Preston, I. Lilies for every garden. 1947 

Schneider, G. The book of choice ferns. 1890. 3 vols. 

Solly, C. Hardy bulbs. 1946 

Sprague, H. B. Better lawns. 1945 

Washington (State) university. Arboretum foundation. Handbook 
of rhododendrons. 1946 

Wilson, H. V. P. Geraniums — pelargoniums for windows and gar- 
dens. 1946 



ECONOMIC PLANTS 

General 

Dahlgren, B. E. Tropical and subtropical fruits. 1947 
Duran-Reynals, M. L. The fever-bark tree, the pageant of quinine. 

1946 
Gunther, E. Ethnobotany of western Washington. 1945 
Jaques, H. E. Plants we eat and wear. 1943 
Morton, K. and J. Fifty tropical fruits of Nassau. 1946 

Vegetables 

Comin, D. Onion production. 1946 

Quarrell, C. P. Intensive salad production; 3d ed. 1945 
Sunset magazine. Sunset's vegetable garden book. 1946 
Thompson, H. C. Asparagus production. 1946 

Herbs 

Whitehead, G. E. Garden herbs — culture, storage, uses. 1942 

Food Processing 

Houston Council of Texas garden clubs. The gardener's cook book. 

1945 
Tressler, D. K. Into the freezer and out. 1946 

Fruit 

^' Allen, W. E. A treatise on an entirely original system of cultivating 

cucumbers . . . forcing broccoli . . . etc. ca. 1825 
Bush, R. Frost and the fruit grower, 2d ed. 1946 
Gardner, V. R. The cherry and its culture; rev. ed. 1946 
Lucas, I. B. Dwarf fruit trees. 1946 

Mowry, H. Miscellaneous tropical and subtropical fruits. 1941 
Robinson, D. H., ed. Vegetable and fruit growers' conference. 1945 
*Speechly, W. A treatise on the culture of the vine. 1790 
Talbert, T. J. General horticulture; principles and practices of or- 
chard, small fruit and garden culture. 1946 
Taylor, H. V. The apples of England; 2d ed. 1945 



26 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Wagner, P. M. A wine-grower's guide . . . wine-growing in America, 
the management of a vineyard, and the choice of suitable wine- 
grape varieties. 1945 



BOTANY 

General 

Cuthbert, M. J. How to know the spring flowers. 1943 

*F . . . . The four seasons: a short account of the structure of plants. 

1865 
Merrill, E. D. Merrilleana, a selection from the general writings of 

E. D. Merrill. 1946 
Muenscher, W. C. Keys to woody plants; 5th ed. rev. 1946 

Genetics and Plant Breeding 

Bergen, J. Y. Jr. and F. D. Primer of Darwinism and organic evo- 
lution. 1890 

Clausen, J. Experimental studies on the nature of species, II. Plant 
evolution through amphiploidy and autoploidy. 1945 

Darlington, C. D. Chromosome atlas of cultivated plants. 1945 

Haworth, J. P. Plant magic. 1946 

Lysenko, T. D. Heredity and its variability . . . trans, from the 
Russian. 1945 

Shaw, F. J. F. A handbook of statistics for use in plant breeding and 
agricultural problems. 1936 

Monographs 

Ames, B., illus. Drawings of Florida orchids by Blanch Ames, with 

explanatory notes by Oakes Ames. 1947 
Benson, L. The cacti of Arizona. 1940 
Conard, H. S. How to know the mosses. 1944 
Ramsbottom, J. Edible fungi. 1943 
Rayner, M. C. Trees and toadstools. 1945 
Stern, F. C. A study of the genus paeonia. 1946 

Floras 

Brimble, L. J. F. Trees in Britain, wild, ornamental and economic, 

and some relatives in other lands. 1946 
Coker, W. C. and Totten, H. R. Southern trees; 3d ed. 1946 
Degener, 0. Plants of Hawaii national park, illustrative of plants 

and customs of the South Seas. 1945 
Dormon, C. Forest trees of Louisiana. 1941 
Embury, E. C. American wild flowers. 1946 
Hutchinson, J. A botanist in southern Africa. 1946 
Limbach, R. T. American trees. 1942 
Lundell, C. L., ed. Flora of Texas, vol. 3. 1942-1944 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 27 

Schroeter, C. Alpine flowers, with color plates by P. A. Roberts. 

1946 
Schroeter, L. and C. Colored vade-mecum to the alpine flora; text 

in English, French and German; ed. 10 and 11 in 1. 
Stone, H. E. Flora of Chester county, Pennsylvania, with especial 

reference to the Flora Cestrica of Dr. William Darlington. 1945 
West, E. and Arnold, L. E. Native trees of Florida. 1946 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

General 

Good, A. H. Park and recreation atructures, II. Recreational and 

cultural facilities. 1938 
Journal of Horticulture. Plans of flower gardens, beds, borders . . . 

ca. 1870 
Morris, N. A. Your book of garden plans. 1946 
Ortloff, H. S. and Raymore, H. B. Garden planning and building; 

rev. ed. 1945 
Pierson, L. R. The garden way from east to west. 1934 
*Puckler-Muskau, H. L. H. Andeuitung Uber Landschaftsgartnerei. 

1834 
Weir, L. H., ed. Parks. 1928. 2 vols, in 1. 

Plant Materials 

Lamson, M. D. Gardening with shrubs and small flowering trees. 

1946 
Nehrling, H. My garden in Florida and miscellaneous horticultural 

notes. 1944-1946. 2 vols. 
O'Donnell, T. C, ed. A garden for you. 1946 
Sturrock, D. Shade and ornamental trees for south Florida and Cuba. 

1946 
Wilson, H. V. P. Perennials preferred. 1946 

Descriptions of Gardens 

Bath, G. H. America's Williamsburg. 1946 
*Lindelberg, H. T. Domestic architecture. 1940 
Oneal, C. M. Gardens and homes of Mexico. 1946 
Salem (Mass.) Garden club. Old Salem gardens. 1946 
Stevens, W. 0. Old Williamsburg and her neighbors. 1938 

AGRICULTURE 

General. Country Life 

Anderson, H. P. Your career in agriculture. 1940 
Barraud, E. M. Set my hand upon the plough, an account of five 
years in the Women's land army. 1946 



28 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Earle, A. M. Home life in colonial days. 1899 

Fenske, T. H. Arithmetic in agriculture. 1945 

Greenberg. D. B. So you're going to buy a farm. 1944 

Hudelson, R. R. Farm management. 1943 

Jones, M. M. Shopwork on the farm. 1947 

Moreland. W. S.. ed. A practical guide to successful farming. 1943 

Ogden, S. R. This country life. 1946 

Orwin, C. S. Problems of the countryside. 1946 

Pearson, H. S. Success on the small farm. 1946 

Schmidt, H. G. Rural Hunterdon, an agricultural history. 1945 

Shannon, F. A. The farmers last frontier: agriculture 1860-1897. 

1946 
Teague, C. C. Fifty years a rancher . . . half a century devoted to 

the citrus and walnut industries of California and to furthering the 

co-operative movement in agriculture. 1944. 
Tetlow, H. We farm for a hobby and make it pay. 1940 
Wend, M. How to live in the country without farming. 1944 

Forestry. Conservation 

Gifford, J. C. Living by the land . . . Florida, the southern United 

States and the Caribbean region. 1945 
Lord, R. Behold our land. 1938 

Sinmions, J. R. Feathers and fur on the turnpike. 1938 
\an Dersal. W. R. The land renewed: the story of soil conservation. 

1946 
Westveld, R. H. Forestry in farm management. 1944 
Wilde, S. A. Forest soils and forest growth. 1946 

NATURE STUDY 

General 

Fenton, C. L. Our living world. 1946 
Jaeger, E. Wildwood wisdom. 1946 
Oliver, G. S. Our friend, the earthworm. 1945 
Teale, E. W. Near horizons, the story of an insect garden. 1944 
Van Dyke, J. C. Nature for its own sake; first studies in natural 
appearances. 1898 

BIOGRAPHY 

Gross, F. Grand Seigneur: Prince Hermann Piickler-Muskau. 1943 

Harris, R. C. Johnny Appleseed source book. 1945 

Ward, C. H. Charles Darwin and the theory of evolution. 1943 

Birds 

Forbush, E. H. Natural history of the birds of eastern and central 
North America; rev. and abridged with the addition of more than 
100 species bv J. R. Mav: illus. bv L. A. Fuertes, A. Brooks and 
R. T. Peterson. 1946 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 29 

Goodrich, A. L., Jr. Birds in Kansas. 1946 
Peterson, R. T. A field guide to the birds. 1939 
Pough, R. H. Audubon bird guide. 1946 

ESSAYS AND POETRY 

Borland, H. An American year. 1946 

Hellings, M. L. Pastoral days. 1945 

Hottes, A. C. 1,001 Christmas facts and fancies; 2d ed. 1944 

Moldenke, H. N. Plants of the Bible. 

Mudge, E. L. God in gardens, poems on the Holy World. 1946 

FINE ARTS 

Biddle, D. and Blom, D. Flower arrangement for everyone. 1947 

Perkins, J. Floral designs for the table. 1877 

Priest, A., ed. Chinese flower and fruit prints. 1946 

Taber, G. and Kistner, R. Flower arranging for the American home. 

1947 
Teele, W. Facts about flower arrangement. 1946 
Wertsner, A. Make your own Merry Christmas. 1946 

TRAVEL 

Cox, E. H. M. Plant hunting in China. 1946 

Thoreau, H. D. Cape Cod. 1914 

Yeager, D. G. Your western national parks. 1947 

BOOKS FOR CHILDREN 

Hogan, I. Nappy planted a garden. 1944 
Huntington, H. E. Let's go outdoors. 1939 
Lenski, L. Strawberry girl. 1946 
Nisenson, S., illus. A picture book of nature. 1943 
Paull, G. A squash for the fair. 1946 

*To be used only in the reading room. 

Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks 
gifts to the Library from the following donors: 

Ames, Professor and Mrs. Cakes 

Drawings of Florida orchids by Blanche Ames, with explanatory 
notes by Oakes Ames. 
Chick, Mrs. W. G. 

Your career in agriculture, by H. P. Anderson. 
Curtis, Mrs. Edith 

Farm management, by R. R. Hudelson. 

A practical guide to successful farming, ed. by W. S. Moreland. 



30 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Farringtox, E. I. 

The soil and health, by Sir Albert Howard. 
FiNDLAY, Hugh 

Gardening for health and happiness, by H. Findlay. 
Hall, Margaret 

Flora of the Colosseum of Rome, by R. Deakin. 

A century of ferns, by W. J. Hooker. 

Ferns, British and exotic, by E. J. Lowe. 8 vols. 
Herb Society of America 

Guide to the Shakespeare garden at the College of St. Elizabeth, 
by Sister Helen Angela. 

Edible fungi, by J. Ramsbottom. 
Ingold, Jack 

Heredity and its variability, by T. D. Lysenko. 
International Harvester Co. 

Man and the soil, by K. B. Mickey. 

Health from the ground up, by K. B. Mickey. 

LiNDEBERG, H. T. 

Domestic architecture, by H. T. Lindeberg. 
McKelvey, Mrs. S. D. 

Emergency food plants and poisonous plants of the islands of 
the Pacific, by E. D. Merrill. 
Merrill, E. D. 

Merrilleana, a selection from the general writings of E. D. Merrill. 
MOLDENKE, H. N. 

Plants of the Bible, by H. N. Moldenke. 
Orcutt, Mrs. P. D. 

The four seasons, by S. M. F. 

Child's book of nature, by W. Hooker. 
QuiNN, Mrs. M. E. 

Garden planting and building, by H. S. Ortloff and H. B. Ray- 
more. 
Ste-ajins, Mrs. Foster 

Florum cultura ... by 1. B. Ferrari. 

Gardens of the Great Mughals, by C. M. Villiars Stuart. 
Teele, Mrs. W. 

Facts about flower arrangement, by W. Teele. 
Waltham Field Station, Massachusetts State College. 

A collection of 25 volumes on gardening. 
Webster, Mrs. H. 

Feathers and furs on the turnpike, by J. R. Simmons. 
Willl\ms, Mrs. F. G. 

New England book of fruits, by J. M. Ives. 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower 

Mission 

On June 1st of this year the Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower 
Mission began its 79th year of continuous service and its 23rd 
year that it has been privileged to maintain its Headquarters in the 
basement of Horticultural Hall. We wish to express again our deep 
appreciation to the Trustees. It was with sincere regret that we 
learned of the resignation of Mr. Farrington who has always been 
interested in our work, a true and kind friend. We were happy to 
know that Mr. Nehrling was to take his place as secretary. 

Five hundred and ninety-two hampers and cartons were received 
at our Centres from 28 towns during this past summer, a gain of 
91 over last year. 

Grafton, Lexington, Duxbury, Hanover, Scituate, Winchester, 
Peabody, WoUaston, Westboro, Arlington, Lincoln, Weston, Sharon, 
Beverly, Newton Centre and Groton had a 100% record. Concord 
and Hingham missed only one week. Grafton was again our banner 
town for the fourth year with a total of 93 hampers and cartons. 
Lexington was second and Duxbury third. 

The distributions at Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter were very 
happy times for us as we were able to reach 438 individuals with 
baskets, gift sprays and gift packages. These mean a great deal to 
our recipients as is shown in their "thank you" letters. 

Mrs. Geoffrey G. Whitney kindly contributed 30 Spring Flower 
Show tickets for special people who could not have attended other- 
wise. It was a gala day for them and one they will long rememlber. 

Flowers from the different shows have been sent to brighten many 
a hospital ward. 

The Fruit and Flower Mission is grateful to all our friends who 
make it possible for us to do this work. 

Ethel E. Hudson, Executive Secretary 



ai 




Sediomr of the Submrbmm Homse mmd Gmrdem, strnged by Bmy Simte Nmneries, 
/nc^ of \orth Abingtam, mi the 1947 SfHmg Flower Shorn; mmmrded Ae 

President's Cup for 1947. 



Reports of the Officers and Committees 

Presented at the 
ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 6, 1947 



The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
was held at Horticultural Hall at 3:00 P.M. on May 6, 1947, with 
the President, Mr. John S. Ames, in the chair. He appointed Mr. 
James Geehan, Mr. Edwin F. Steffek, Miss Faith Freeman and Miss 
Lucille Hubbard as tellers. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the secretary, read the call for the meeting 
and the minutes of the previous annual meeting, after which the 
president presented his annual address. 



The President's Address 

Perhaps the most significant development in 1946 was a surprising 
upsurge of interest in the Society and its work, as indicated by the 
membership figures. More than 1600 new members were added in 
the course of the year, breaking in this respect all records in the 
Society's long history. The total was, in fact, about 300 more than 
had been added in any previous year. The highest total on any 
previous date was 9,044. Then it became necessary to increase the 
dues from two dollars a year to three dollars, and in the two follow- 
ing years a total loss of 2,000 members was sustained. This loss has 
now been regained, as the increase has continued so far in the present 
year. The total membership as of today is 9,440. 

Doubtless the most important event in 1946 was the announcement 
that the Department of Internal Revenue in Washington had reversed 
itself in respect to its classification of this Society. Twice before, 
serious efforts had been made to gain recognition of the Society as 
an educational and charitaible organization and, therefore, not sub- 
ject to inheritance and gift taxes. Both attempts had failed. 

Last Summer, Mr. Charles Hovey, acting as the Society's attorney, 
and with the assistance of his associate, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, 
prepared a very long and comprehensive brief, based on material 
supplied by the staff at Horticultural Hall, and with the authority of 
the Executive Committee, and filed it with the Department. This 
time, the arguments were so unassailable and the presentation so 

33 



ANNUAL MEETING 35 

brilliant, that the Society was promptly given a new classification, 
and no taxes will be imposed on bequests and gifts to the Society. 

The campaign for adding to the Society's Endowment Fund was 
brought to a close at the end of the year 1946, although contributions 
are still coming in from pledges. The campaign was not as success- 
ful as had been hoped, but the amount raised was not insignificant, 
the total now standing at $31,319.95. 

Bequests of $50,000.00 each were made to the Society by Miss 
Marion Roby Case and her sister Miss Louisa Case, and half of this 
amount has already been received. The Joseph E. Chandler property 
was sold for approximately $25,000 and $20,000 was received to- 
gether with a note for $5,000. The Society is deeply grateful for the 
interest and generosity of these donors. 

In the course of last year, Mr. Richard C. Paine found it necessary 
to resign as a Trustee of the Society, and Mr. Stedman Buttrick was 
chosen by the Trustees to fill out Mr. Paine's unexpired term. Mr. 
Buttrick is an ardent gardener, and has a beautiful estate in Concord, 
where he specializes in the growing of irises, having an unusually 
comprehensive collection. 

The president, with members of the House Committee, and a com- 
petent builder, looked over the exterior of the building last year and 
came to the conclusion that certain repairs should be undertaken as 
soon as feasible. The pointing up of the bricks on the front and 
on one side is particularly necessary. Ejnergency work of this kind 
was undertaken at once on the back of the building to correct a bad 
leak. The structural soundness of the building is, however, a matter 
of comment, and architects sometimes look it over to observe the 
unique methods followed in its construction. Interior repairs, made 
impossible while the war lasted, are needed and probably can soon 
be undertaken. 

Early this year, it again became necessary to seek legal assistance, 
when the Society learned of a bill before the legislature which would 
permit levying taxes on Horticultural Hall unless the practice of 
accepting rentals should be abandoned, thus entailing an annual loss 
of from $6,000 to $8,000. At a committee hearing in February, 
however. Commissioner Long, who apparently initiated the proposed 
legislation, said that he would willingly accept an amendment to 
exclude horticultural societies from the bill, permitting it to affect 
only agricultural societies. 

It is my pleasure to announce that this Spring the Society has 
received from our former president, Mr. Edwin S. Webster, a large 
portrait of himself. It has been hung in the secretary's ofiSce. This 
portrait was executed in November of 1925 by the well-known painter 



36 ' ANNUAL MEETING 

Philip A. de Laszlo. The Society is fortunate in having such a valu- 
able addition to our collection of portraits of the presidents of this 
Society. 

On January 1st, 1947, Mr. Edward I. Farrington resigned as secre- 
tary after 23 years of extraordinarily valuable service. He succeeded 
William P. Rich, who also served the Society over a long period of 
years. 

At the time Mr. Farrington took over his duties as secretarv, the 
affairs of this Society were rather dormant. But, during his years 
of activity, when he served under the following presidents, Albert C. 
Burrage, Edwin S. Webster and myself, Mr. Farrington completelv 
revitalized the organization. Between 1923 and 1946, he increased 
the membership, for example, from 1,010 to nearly 9,000. 

In addition, he greatly extended the services and influence of the 
Society so that it became a national organization of great impor- 
tance. Membership now, for instance, includes 46 of the 48 states. 

And of particular service to this Society, as well as to all gardeners 
everywhere, Mr. Farrington developed our magazine HORTICUL- 
TURE to a commanding position in gardening journalism. He 
brought this magazine with him to this Society, greatly enlarged its 
circulation both locallv and nationally, and made it not only our 
official publication, but also that of the New York Horticultural 
Society, the Pennsylvania Society, and the Garden Center of Cleve- 
land. 

While it is impossible to overvalue Mr. Farrington's services, and 
while we are all conscious of the loss his resignation means to the 
Society, we have been fortunate to be able to appoint Mr. Arno H. 
Nehrling to his place. We believe that we are to be congratulated 
in having a man of Mr. Nehrling's experience and capacity available 
and willing to undertake the duties and responsibilities of the sec- 
retaryship. You will remember that for the past 14 years, Mr. 
Xehrling has been a very highly respected member of our staff and 
the man who has been responsible for the successful operation of our 
flower show program. 

Mr. John S. Ames, President 

Report of the Secretary 

(Since Mr. E. I. Farrington, secretary of the Society for 23 years, 
resigned as of January 1, 1947, and was succeeded by Mr. Arno H. 
Nehrling, this report is a joint statement by both gentlemen. The 
report was presented by Mr. Nehrling.) 

It is my privilege to begin this presentation of the report of the 
secretaries of this Society by expressing my obligation to my pred- 



ANNUAL MEETING 37 

ecessor, Mr. Farrington. As Show Director, I worked with him for 
the 14 years ending this January and, in that time, I found him al- 
ways cooperative, always capable and always unselfish in promoting 
the welfare of our organization and of all related horticultural inter- 
ests. Such success as it may be my good fortune to experience in 
my present office, I will owe in no small measure to the example set 
by Mr. Farrington. 

As the president has reported, the number of new members added 
last year broke all records in the Society's history. It is pleasant to 
state that this rate of increase has continued into the present year. 
It must be remembered, however, that the losses must be taken into 
account before a total increase in membership can be figured. As a 
rule, from 800 to 1,000 new members must be enrolled each year to 
compensate for the number of names which are removed. A study 
of the necrology list in the Yearbook will indicate the reason for 
many of the removals. The Society's growth cannot be maintained 
without unremitting efFort. Fortunately, all the exhibitions offer an 
excellent opportunity to present the Society's activities to new people. 
Each year, too, several hundred persons who have become interested 
in the Society through its magazine HORTICULTURE change from 
subscribers to members. The large increase in membership among 
persons in distant states is due, probably, to the fact that through 
the m'agazine they learn about the Society's library and its policy of 
sending books to members wherever they may live. The reputation 
of this great library is nation-wide. Undoubtedly, it serves more 
persons than any other library of the kind in the United States. 

The books sponsored by the Society have continued to have a wide 
sale. The Gardener's Travel Book has been completely revised and 
is in the publisher's hands. Mrs. Mollis Webster's Herb book, the 
Lawn book and the Rock Garden book, out of print for several 
months, have been placed in the hands of a new publisher and soon, 
it is hoped, will be ready for distribution again. The sale of garden 
books in general, carried on through the Society's Book Department, 
has shown rapid growth, and is appreciated as a service. 

Negotiations were completed last Fall for the purchase of Man- 
ning's Plant Buyer's Index from the widow of the late J. Woodward 
Manning and this valuable book is now the Society's property. Sev- 
eral months will be required for its revision, but when it is issued 
in a new and improved form, it is certain to be well received, for 
already orders or inquiries are coming in. 

Last year, the Society did its part in the promotion of home vege- 
table gardens. It is felt now, however, that the food emergency has 
come to an end and that no reason exists why the Society should 



38 ANNUAL MEETING 

undertake to sponsor vegetable gardens, although it is ready at all 
times to assist any organization or group of persons working to 
encourage the making of home vegetable gardens, or, indeed, gardens 
of any kind. 

I attended the organization meeting of United Horticulture in 
Cleveland last year and am a member of the Board of Directors. Our 
Society has been working toward such a project for many years, 
concrete plans having been outlined in HORTICULTURE long before 
the subject began to assume general interest. 

Last year I also attended a meeting in Washington called by the 
Department of Agriculture to discuss the food situation from the 
viewpoint of the amateur gardener. It was decided that vegetable 
gardening should be encouraged but that the program should also 
include extensive planting of ornamentals. 

At a meeting of the Trustees last year, it was voted that the money 
received from the sale of the Joseph Everett Chandler property in 
Sudbury shall appear on the Society's books as the Joseph Everett 
Chandler Memorial Fund. 

The Trustees also voted last year to participate in a plan to place 
a suitable stone on the grave of the late Ernest H. Wilson, the Arnold 
Arboretum's famous plant hunter, in Mount Royal Cemetery in Mon- 
treal. Donations for this purpose were started by the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society with an appropriation of $500. 

Annual members will be interested to know that the Trustees have 
voted that they may become life members by paying an amount equal 
to three dollars a year from any given date to a period marking 
25 years of membership. It is the custom of the Trustees to make 
life members of all persons who have been annual members for 
25 years. 

An active and prominent member was lost last year when William 
H. Judd, propagator at the Arnold Arboretum, died suddenly after 
running to a fire near his home. Mr. Judd served as a judge over a 
long period of years and seldom missed an exhibition. He was fre- 
quently called upon by members of the staff for help and advice. It is 
pleasant to learn that a fund for a memorial to Mr. Judd is being 
raised at the Arboretum. 

The garden awards, the special medal awards and the award of 
the Burrage Cup for 1946 have been announced in HORTICULTURE. 
They represent conscientious work on the part of three able com- 
mittees. 

Just a week ago, this Society, as well as all American horticulture, 
suffered a great loss in the passing of William N. Craig of Weymouth. 
Formerly a vice-president of this Society and for years one of the 



ANNUAL MEETING 39 

outstanding exhibitors at our flower shows, Mr. Craig was without 
question one of the outstanding plantsmen of our country — if not of 
the world. His knowledge was encyclopedic and, as the many medals 
and awards he received from this Society testify, his skill was equally 
great. In a very real sense, he represented what may be termed the 
"old school" of horticulture. Today, fashions have changed. This is 
an age of specialists, even in gardening, and we no longer have young 
men developing whose acquaintance with all phases of gardening can 
equal that of those masters whose ranks, already very thin, are now 
further reduced by the death of our mutual friend and colleague, 
William N. Craig. 

Plans for the year ahead, as previously mentioned, begin with a 
serious and continued effort to increase our membership well above 
the present mark of 9,440. We hope to have at least 10,000 by the 
first of the year and from that point to go on. Although this Society 
is already the largest of its kind in North America, and only surpassed 
in all the world by the Royal Horticultural Society of London, we 
face an urgent need for an expanding membership. The primary 
necessity for this is that, in the post-war world, our obligation to be 
of service to all gardeners has greatly increased. As can be readily 
seen, we can meet this obligation of service primarily only through 
an enlarged membership. 

A second development is the enlargement of our flower show pro- 
gram — both in the number of shows and in the content of each 
individual show. For example, this Society is producing 12 shows 
in 1947. Of this dozen, ten are free to the public. The importance 
of this item of our services is based upon the fact that through our 
shows we reach a very large number of people and at least introduce 
them to horticulture and to gardening. It is certain that by no other 
means could our Society thus meet this part of its obligation to our 
country. 

The development of our show program also includes effective co- 
operation with other organizations, particularly those of a horti- 
cultural nature. For example, in 1947, our shows have been and are 
being held in cooperation with such organizations as the Chrysanthe- 
mum Society of America, the American Peony Society, the American 
Delphinium Society, the American Rose Society, the American Iris 
Society, the American Rock Garden Society, the New England Gladi- 
olus Society, the New England Carnation Growers Association and 
others, including such organizations as the Arnold Arboretum, the 
Massachusetts State College, the Waltham Field Station and similar 
educational and horticultural institutions. In fact, to summarize this 
point, it is not too much to say that because of this Society, Boston 



40 ANNUAL MEETING 

is not only maintaining its place in horticulture, but has actually 
become the horticultural center of America. 

A fourth development is the reactivation and the enlargement of 
our educational activities. For instance, our lecture program, be- 
ginning next Fall, will bring to our platform the country's most 
prominent speakers and authorities. At the same time, we hope to 
institute primarily educational courses in such subjects as landscape 
design and botany. This Spring, and somewhat in the nature of an 
experiment which, I am happy to say, has promise of great success, 
we have instituted two new types of lectures. The first is a free 
course of evening lectures on planting the home grounds. This is 
intended primarily for veterans who have just acquired new homes, 
but it is meeting the needs of all families who wish to plant or to 
improve their home grounds. The attendance has far exceeded our 
expectations. The second is a free course of instruction for school 
children between the ages of 10 and 15. It is aimed at teaching the 
elements of gardening, as well as to awaken their interest in plants, 
so that, in the years to come, they will develop into competent gar- 
deners. Such courses as these, we feel, are of value not only to the 
individuals concerned, but are also typical of the services to society 
which it is the purpose of our organization to provide. 

A final point, among many others, on our new program concerns 
the development of our Society's magazine, HORTICULTURE, into 
new fields of usefulness as a national garden publication. Held back 
at the moment by paper shortage, before long we will be enabled 
greatly to increase its circulation and thus multiply its value. Mean- 
while, under our new editor, William H. Clark, we are adding to the 
familiar format. We plan to continue, as before, the pattern of pre- 
senting individual experiences and discoveries by informed amateurs. 
This makes the magazine something of a friendly visitor who comes 
to call upon each of our 40,000 odd subscribers 20 times a year. This 
is the basic editorial policy. But, in addition, we are adding a series 
of strong articles by leading authorities, each writing in his own 
particular specialized field. By this means, we expect to add to the 
value of the magazine. We want every issue to give each reader 
information and inspiration which will make him a better gardener. 
Then, too, we are adding to our staff of contributors, representatives 
of all outstanding educational and scientific organizations so that 
our magazine will be the leading publication in its field. 

By this development of our magazine, by our lecture courses, by 
our educational activities and by our shows, we believe we will 
further increase the value of our Society not to its membership alone, 
important and necessary as that is, but to the entire nation. 



ANNUAL MEETING 41 

Thanks to the devoted labors of the officers who have preceded us, 
the many distinguished ladies and gentlemen who have, through 119 
years, built up this Society to its commanding place, we are in an 
excellent position to undertake this new program, this enlargement 
of what has been done, this reorientation to meet the present needs 
of the day — and the greater opportunities and obligations which will 
be ours tomorrow. 

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a great Society. With your help 
and the support of our 10,000 members, the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society will unquestionably prove itself to be even greater 
in the years ahead. 

Edward I. Farrington 
Arno H. Nehrling 

Secretaries 

Report of the Exhibitions Cominittee 

This committee is charged with the planning of all exhibits spon- 
sored by the Society working in close cooperation with the Executive 
Secretary who also acts as Show Manager, and also as Secretary of 
the committee, and with the Prize Committee. The organization is 
a very excellent one. Nine meetings were held during the year, and 
one joint meeting with the prize committee. All meetings were well 
attended and all members contributed materially in reference to 
the various problems involved, particularly to the numerous ones 
associated with such an extensive activity as the Spring Flower Show. 

Eleven shows were sponsored by the Society. The total attendance 
at these shows was about the same as in the previous year. The 
Fall Show was re-initiated, after a lapse of one year, and its total 
attendance was about 2000 more than at the last one held in 1945. 
Among the smaller shows held in Horticultural Hall, the Lily Show 
attracted the greatest attention. Visitors came from all parts of the 
United States and Canada, and exhibits were received from as far 
as Oregon and Washington. This show is attaining national pro- 
portions, an indication of the wisdom in initiating it in 1942. The 
development of this annual show w^as made possible by a gift of 
S2000.00 from the late W. N. Craig, the income from the fund to 
be used in encouraging interest in the lilies. Although the date 
for the June show was early, the rose exhibits were actually larger 
and more numerous than at any corresponding show in many years. 

In past years curiously the Committee has not always been able 
to select the best dates for individual shows because of pre-existing 
arrangements made in reference to rentals of the exhibition space in 
Horticultural Hall for extraneous purposes. This situation has now 



42 ANNUAL MEETING 

been adjusted, the Executive Secretary having been directed by the 
Exhibition Committee to write in the approximate preferred dates 
for the regularly scheduled shows a year in advance, so as to obviate 
certain rental difficulties that the committee has encountered in the 
past. It was felt that the Society should always have first choice 
as to the time when regularly approved shows were to be held, and 
that other organizations desiring to utilize certain facilities in Horti- 
cultural Hall on a rental basis should adjust their needs to the in- 
terests of the Society. No future difficulties are expected in this 
matter. 

In 1946 the Spring Flower Show registered the largest attendance 
and incidentally the largest profits to the Society in the 75 years 
that this show has been an annual activity of the Society, the attend- 
ance being 129,085. In 1947 the attendance was somewhat less, 
totalling 126,423, this relatively small decline probably being largely 
due to one rainy day during the show week. Although the expenses 
of installation increased because of the labor situation and the in- 
creased cost of supplies, varying from ten to fifteen per cent in most 
categories, the total budget was only a few thousand dollars more 
than the amount originally approved. I am happy to report that 
the profit on the 1947 Spring Show will approximately equal that 
of the outstandingly successful year of 1946. The Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society is indeed to be congratulated. 

An important change has been made in the methods of accounting 
for all show expenditures and for all receipts in connection with 
the two shows where admission fees are charged. The new account- 
ant has installed a simplified system appertaining to show expendi- 
tures and receipts. The result is that about two weeks after the 
closing of the Spring Show the committee had available a fairly 
accurate statement as to costs and receipts, in striking contrast to 
the situation that existed in former years when several months elapsed 
before the financial situation was entirely clear. 

Members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society realize in 
general that the financial support of its activities comes from several 
sources, the important ones being income from its endowment (and 
I may say that the endowment of the Society should be increased), 
from membership fees, and from the profits accruing from the annual 
Spring Flower Show. The importance of the Spring Flower Show 
profits to the Society is evidenced by the fact that in 1945 and 1946 
the Society actually operated on a deficit. However, the financially 
successful exhibition of 1946 enabled the Society to cover the deficit 
that had accrued, and still add a certain amount to the Flower Show 
Reserve fund. When the books were finally closed in 1946, a total 



ANNUAL MEETINC 43 

of $19,380.30 from the Spring Show profits was added by the Trustees 
to the Reserve Fund, in the belief that there was a sufficient amount 
still available to cover the accrued deficit in the operations of the 
Society for 1945 and 1946. Later, $6,852.07 was taken from this 
fund for deficit coverage, leaving the gross addition to the Reserve 
Fund $12,538.23. It is believed that this policy of adding a certain 
part of the profits of the Spring Show to the Reserve Fund should 
be continued as conditions permit, for this fund is invested and 
the income therefrom becomes available for budgetary purposes. If 
at some future time the Reserve Fund should become unduly large, 
such part of it as may be desirable may, by proper action, be trans- 
ferred to the regular endowment of the Society. Thus over a term 
of years the total unrestricted endowment of the Society may be 
gradually increased from its exhibitions operations. In passing I 
may explain that the Reserve Fund was originally established to 
cover any possible deficit on Spring Show operations that might be 
caused Tjy conditions beyond our control, such as inclement weather. 
Of course such parts of the Flower Show profits as may be needed 
to help support the legitimate activities of the Society should be 
made so available, but we have full confidence in the management 
and the trustees in this matter. Here it may not be amiss to mention 
the fact that a very considerable part of the total endowment of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society is restricted, in that the income 
from certain funds may be used only for specified purposes, such as 
prizes, medals, purchase of books for the library, etc. Clearly, the 
need is for additions to the unrestricted endowment, and any en- 
dowment fund built up from Spring Show profits could be placed 
in this desirable category. 

One additional full time assistant was added to the Flower Show 
department during the year, this being essential because of the pro- 
motion of Mr. Nehrling to the position of Executive Secretary of 
the Society. He still acts as Flower Show Manager and devotes 
much of his time to exhibition matters. This centralization of 
authority proves to have been a most excellent move. Changes in 
accounting methods have greatly facilitated the work of the Show 
Manager. While the Spring Show was in progress the services of 
a number of experienced individuals were available to assist with 
the numerous details which greatly helped to eliminate confusion, 
and ensured a smooth working show organization. I am happy to 
report that very few complaints were received from visitors to the 
Show. 

Again I wish to extend our appreciation to all who participated 
in the Spring as well as in the ten other shows sponsored by the 



44 ANNUAL MEETir/G 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Without the full and cordial 
cooperation of the numerous exhibitors we manifestly could not 
possibly operate successfully in the exhibition field. I wish also 
to extend my thanks to the members of the Exhibitions Committee 
for the time and energy they have devoted to its affairs, and to the 
members of the Prize Committee for the cooperation of that group. 
And to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society I extend my con- 
gratulations on the successful termination of another year in its 
long history as to exhibitions. In closing, I wish to place on record 
my personal appreciation of the long services rendered to the Society 
in all of its activities, including exhibition matters, of Mr. Farrington. 
who retired as Secretary in December, 1946, and to congratulate 
the Society on its having in its employ such an outstanding Show 
Manager, now Executive Secretary of the Society, as Mr. Nehrling. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 

The routine procedure of the Committee on Prizes has been to 
select as judges men of the highest caliber available, to explain to 
them the framework within which they must work as prescribed by 
the Rule Book of the Society: requesting "scaling" where competition 
is involved; inviting recommendations for award of the Society's 
"certificates" for new and noteworthy introductions: — and in all 
cases to pass in review the records submitted by these judges. 

It may be accepted as axiomatic that judging cannot be considered 
an exact science. Even as written in the Rule Book, the "most 
meritorious," the "most beautiful," the "highest degree of culture," 
the "most outstanding" present a problem of meaning which is 
susceptible of different interpretation by the individual judges. The 
essence of the business of our committee has been to discharge our 
responsibility by attempting to reach in advance of judging a 
definite understanding; to appraise with absolute impartiality; to 
discuss the divergent appraisals and eventually reach harmonious 
agreement. 

Whenever requested by an exhibitor, the committee has meticu- 
lously reviewed the judicial decisions. Such reviews. I personally 
regard as helpful both to the exhibitor, when reasonable, and to the 
committee, who could conceivably be less familiar with advanced 
development in new work than the hybridizer or specialist. 

With regard to awarding the Society's certificates, I would rec- 
ommend that we bring in order and up to date our card catalog 
and in general follow the analogous procedure of the International 
Horticultural Cono^resses which were held in London in 1930 — Paris, 



ANNUAL MEETING 45 

1932, and Rome, 1935. There a set of rules for horticultural nomen- 
clature were laid down which appear in the Journal of the R. H. S. 
Volume 62, p. 38-39 of 1937. These cover all the situations arising 
in naming horticultural varieties of plants and should be followed 
by horticulturists all over the world. In simplified form, they are 
as follows: 

1. A name shall apply to only one variety. If by chance the same 
name should be given independently to two varieties, the first use 
has priority. 

2. Only one name shall be given to a variety. If more than one 
name should be applied to a variety, the first use has priority. 

3. A name once applied to a variety shall not be used again, even 
though the variety to which it was first applied may have apparently 
disappeared. 

4. Names in whatever language they were first used should not 
be changed, modified or used in translated form. Exceptions: lan- 
guages that cannot be written in Roman characters. 

5. When new varieties are named and introduced, adequate 
descriptions should be published in dated catalogs or recognized 
horticultural journals. A name is not established until this is done. 

6. Names should be short; two words at most suffice. It is in- 
advisable to use the titles Mr., Mrs., Dr., etc. 

7. Latin or latinized names should not be used for horticultural 
varieties. Such names are reserved for botanical specimens. 

8. To indicate the originator or introducer of a variety, rather 
than make his name a part of the variety name, it should be placed 
in brackets after the name. 

9. It is inadvisable to use a name that closely resembles in spelling 
and pronunciation any name in use or that has been in use. 

10. Varieties should not be named and introduced unless they 
are different from or superior to varieties already in propagation. 
It may be pointed out that a fixed sport of any variety propagated 
by a grower may be named a new variety. It should be propagated 
for some time before introducing it to make sure that it is fixed, 
will not revert to the original, and has not been previously named. 

Ready availability of such a card catalog would be of great ad- 
vantage to the Committee on Prizes. 

Seriously or otherwise, judges are occasionally ribbed because 
decisions are at variance with the general public's verdict. While 
unfortunate, the explanation is not difficult. Every exhibit appears 
to the judge as an intelligence test. The judge must work within 



46 ANNUAL MEETING 

rules which have been considerately defined in advance; he must 
appraise the degree of excellence attained in the exhibitor's effort 
to meet a problem; and when the exhibitor is in competition, the 
finer points and qualities of his attainment are evaluated conscien- 
tiously by not just one judge but by a committee of judges, while 
the general public, at all events, and occasionally even the exhibitor, 
— has not had access to or knowledge of the Rule Book. 

On behalf of the Committee on Prizes, I wish here to record the 
sincere thanks and appreciation of the Committee to all of the ladies 
and gentlemen who have served as judges during the past year. 

George 0. Clark, Chairman 

Report of the Committee on the Exhibitions 
of the Products of Children's Gardens 

It is gratifying to report that the interest in gardening on the part 
of the children is as great today as it was during the war. Mr. 
Daniel O'Brien informs me that there were just as many, if not more, 
gardens cultivated the past season. The children were encouraged 
to grow more flowers in their plots, which made the gardens more 
interesting and also meant that the Children's Show was much more 
colorful than in former years. 

We had a very poor growing season in this section of New England, 
which made gardening a little more difiScult. Tomatoes, for example, 
which is a favorite crop of the children, were attacked by a blight 
and in a good many cases never produced fruit. Even beans, as a 
rule an easy crop to grow, did not do well. These conditions were 
reflected in a smaller number of entries at the show. The decrease 
in the number of entries was even greater in the 4-H Club Section of 
the show, indicating that growing conditions were about the same 
all over the state. The 4-H Club entries decreased from 576 in 
1945 to 270 last year. The drop was not quite as evident in the 
School and Home Garden Section, where the entries totaled 959 in 
1945 compared to 887 last year. 

It began to rain two days before the show opened and so all the 
material on exhibition had to be gathered under extremely difficult 
conditions. This is probably another reason why there were fewer 
entries. 

The competition in Class No. 1 in the School and Home Garden 
Section of the show was very close and, in fact, the judges had to 
resort to scoring the exhibits, something that is not often necessary 
at the Children's Show. Since there is no score card in the Rule 
Book for a collection of vegetables and flowers, the judges had to 



ANNUAL MEETING 47 

prepare a special set of rules for these exhibits. Mr. Henry G. 
Wendler suggests that for the 1947 show, a scale of points be pre- 
pared in advance and published in the schedule. This will eliminate 
a lot of confusion and save a great deal of time on the part of the 
judges. 

After the show, the children presented the vegetables and flowers 
on exhibition to the Fruit and Flower Mission. Miss Ethel E. 
Hudson, the executive secretary of this organization, wrote me that 
the chidren were very generous and that her organization appreciated 
their giving them the opportunity to distribute their flowers and 
vegetables. The flowers were sent to the Boston Home for Incurables, 
the Mattapan Tuberculosis Hospital and the Burnap Free Home for 
Aged Women, and the vegetables to the Ellis Memorial, the Bureau 
for Aged Women, Lincoln House, Little Sisters of the Poor, the 
House of the Good Shepherd, the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament 
and several families that the Fruit and Flower Mission has on its 
list. These flowers gave a great deal of happiness and comfort to 
the sick and lonely. The vegetables were a real treat, for with the 
rising prices, many of these people cannot afford luxuries. 

For a number of years, the Committee has been trying to widen 
the scope of the Children's Show and encourage children from sur- 
rounding communities to participate. This has finally been brought 
about through the cooperation of the garden teachers in neighboring 
communities. We will continue to encourage children from all sec- 
tions of Massachusetts to participate in the Children's Show. Mem- 
bers of the Society, as well as the garden clubs, should invite children 
in their respective communities to exhibit in groups, as organizations, 
or as individuals. The schedule for the coming show is ready for 
distribution and any child under 18 years of age may exhibit. 

In closing this report, I would like to express my thanks to Mr. 
Daniel O'Brien, assistant director in charge of gardening and vo- 
cational agriculture in the Boston schools, and Mr. Henry G. Wendler, 
his assistant, for their untiring efforts and careful planning of the 
children's gardens, and for their assistance in staging the show so 
eflSciently. The Committee also extends its thanks to Mr. Earle 
Nodine, who with his 4-H Club boys and girls, always stages an 
exhibit that is a credit to any show. 

S. J. GoDDARD, Chairman 



48 ANNUAL MEETING 

Report of the Library Committee 1946-1947 

The objectives of the Library Committee are to assist the librarian 
in increasing the resources of the remarkably fine library of the 
Society. As chairman I wish to express to all members of the com- 
mittee my appreciation of their services and to the librarian our 
appreciation of her cooperation. 

The year just past has been a very busy one in the library. There 
has been a steadily growing number of visits, letters, and telephone 
calls from members and others, upon all sorts of gardening problems. 
The record of books loaned is an index to this phase of the work. 
In 1946 there was an increase of fully 25 per cent, with a total of 
5,106 books sent out. Some of these volumes went to members in 
the south, mid west and far west, 1,609 being packages mailed. 

There have been more committees holding regular meetings here, 
but fewer garden clubs coming in for meetings or having members 
of the library staff for programs in their own towns. This is a sharp 
contrast with the preceding year. 

The book collection was increased by 352 volumes, and the list is 
published in the Year Book. The Committee voted that the reading 
list "Four Hundred Books for Amateur Gardeners" should be kept 
up-to-date. A new printing of it with revisions was made recently, 
and the printer is now holding it in type so that each new issue may 
include the latest books. Copies of the original printing went to 
each member of the Society, and all new members receive it. 

The recataloging is progressing steadily, and is proving its value 
in making the books more easily accessible to readers and in answer- 
ing questions more quickly and effectively. 

At the 1947 Spring Flower Show the library staff, under the Refer- 
ence Librarian, again took charge of the Information Booth. 

The garden club year books sent in for the annual competition in 
HORTICULTURE are made up into sets for loan to clubs and garden 
centers, and they are in constant use all through the year. The present 
list of borrowers includes groups in the State of Washington, Mon- 
tana, Ohio, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Kansas, Pennsylvania and New 
York as well as in Massachusetts, and enthusiastic letters report a 
variety of uses for display, publicity and study. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman 



ANNUAL MEETING 49 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION 

Assets 

Cash in Banks and on Hand $ 37,607.04 

Treasurer: In bank $ 14,242.54 

Bursar: In bank 23,339.50 

On hand 25.00 

$ 37,607.04 

Investments Valued at Book Value 700,745.21 

Capital Assets 592,586.38 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to build- 
ings 47,441.28 

Library 46,580.47 

$592,586.38 
Deferred Charge 

Spring Show, 1947 1,534.95 

$1,332,473.58 

Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities — Accounts Payable $ 1,239.95 

Sundry Funds 529,078.89 

Special uses: 

Principal $167,326.62 

Unexpended Income. . 11,807.13 

$179,133.75 

General uses: Principal 349,945.14 

$529,078.89 

Greater Endowment Fund 30,878.38 

Life Membership Fees 28,006.00 

Mount Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053.52 

Show Insurance Fund 53,177.93 

January 1, 1946 $ 40,314.38 

Net Transfer from Profit and Loss . . . 12,558.23 
Adjustment, 1945 Show Fund Income 305.32 

Balance, December 31, 1946 $ 53,177.93 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 70,514.21 

Balance, January 1, 1946 $ 66,559.21 

Add: Net profit on sale of securities. . 3,955.00 

$ 70,514.21 

Surplus (earned) 

Balance, January 1, 1946 $ -4,967.89 

Transferred from Profit and Loss 4,967.90 

$1,332,473.58 



50 ANNUAL MEETING 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income 

1946 1945 

Income from Investments $ 32,593.92 $ 33,234.65 

Membership Fees 15,163.00 13,283.50 

Rentals 6,742.43 5,168.62 

Spring Show 78,250.54 28,666.72 

"Horticulture" Income 9,185.26 78.90 

Other Receipts 3,087.69 1,801.77 

$145,022.84 $ 82,234.16 
Expenditures 

Building Expenses $ 21,790.05 $ 24,635.87 

Library Expenses 11,302.08 7,571.91 

Office and General Salaries and Expense 52,049.89 33,926.29 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses .... 8,586.16 5,660.13 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates 33,637.^5 15,158.45 

Other payments 167.50 

$127,532.93 $ 86,952.65 

Excess of Income over Expenditures — 

All Funds $ 17,532.93 $ -4,718.49 

Difference Between Current Income 

Additions and Current Expenses charged 

on Restricted Funds -36.21 2,451.03 

S 17,526.12 $ -7,169.52 
Net Transfer to Show Insurance Fund 

from Spring Show Income 1946 12,558.23 

Balance of Income or Loss . . $ 4,967.89 $ -7,169.52 

By vote of the Board of Trustees the ac- 
cumulated deficit was charged to the 
Show Insurance Fund. 

Walter Hunnewell, Treasurer 

Result of the Balloting 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 66 votes having been cast, 
and the following persons were declared elected; 

President: John S. Ames 
Vice-President: Aubrey B. Butler 
Trustees: Samuel Goddard, Ernest Hoftyzer, Ray M. Koon, 
Elmer D. Merrill, Harold S. Ross 



William N. Craig 



Gardeners everywhere will mourn the passing of a great plantsman. 
The late William N. Craig of Weymouth was an outstanding horti- 
cukural personality and one of the ablest plantsmen in our time. 
Along with his strictly professional and business duties, Mr. Craig 
carried on extensive correspondence with gardeners in many coun- 
tries, became a much sought after lecturer and established himself 
as a horticultural journalist. The files of the old Garden and Forest 
published back in the nineties contain some of his earliest American 
writing. He was a regular contributor to the Florists Review for 
45 years. One book entitled "Lilies and Their Culture in North 
America" pioneered in that particular field. 

Mr. Craig will be remembered for his efforts in popularizing the 
hardy lily. The lily shows of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society are made possible by a sizeable gift which Mr. Craig made 
some years ago to further all phases of lily culture. 

Throughout his career, Mr. Craig was an influential member and 
officer of numerous horticultural organizations, notably the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society, the Horticultural Club of Boston, the 
National Association of Gardeners and the Gardeners' and Florists' 
Club of Boston, as well as trade organizations and special plant 
societies. 

In March 1943, "William N. Craig Night" was held by the Gar- 
deners' and Florists' Club of Boston to honor this unusually loyal 
member who had not missed a regular meeting in 39 years and had 
long held office in the club. A more recent honor was the George 
Robert White medal of honor from the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society. 

Coming to the United States in 1890 after a thorough training in 
his native Britain, Mr. Craig settled in the environs of Boston and 
spent his life there. Up until 1922, when he established his own 
business at Weymouth, Mass., he was known for his able management 
of the F. L. Ames estate in North Easton, Mass., and Faulkner Farm 
in Brookline. During his later years, Mr. Craig traveled widely in 
Europe and the West Indies. 



51 



Necrology 



The following is a list of the members of the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society whose deaths were reported during the year ending 
May 1, 1947. 

Mr. Stephen P. Alden 

Mrs. Arthur N. Ailing 

Mrs. Harriette B. Bell 

Mr. James Bishop 

Miss Mary E. Bosworth 

Mrs. Henry E. Bothfield 

Mrs. Raymond Bowley 

Mr. Edward W. Breed 

Mrs. Charles F. Broughton 

Mrs. Fred H. Burdett 

Miss Alice E. Bumham 

Miss Louise W. Case 

Mr. Ernest D. Chapman 

Mrs. C. Thurston Chase 

Mr. H. F. Chase 

Mrs. George B. Churchill 

Mrs. Henry W. Clark 

Mr. Langdon Coffin 

Mr. William Nicol Craig 

Miss M. H. Cudworth 

Mrs. Nellie B. Cumner 

Mr. Elton G. Cushman 

Mrs. De Forest Danielson 

Mrs. W. Endicott Dexter 

Mrs. Nancy A. Dorr 

Mr. Aubrey T. Dunbar 

Miss Anna R. Ellis 

Mrs. George 0. Evans 

Mrs. Timothy J. Falvey 

Mr. Edward J. Feeley 

Miss Mabel C. Friend 

Miss Adeline Bradbury Gill 

Mrs. HoUis Godfrey 

Mr. John Gordon 

Mr. Alphonse Grassey 

Rev. Thaddeus William Harris 

Mr. George A. Hartwell 

Mr. George P. Hay^vard 

Mr. Ira G. Hersey 

Miss Myrta Margaret Higgins 

Mrs. Walter L. Hobbs 

Miss Dorothy M. Hobson 

Mrs. Frank L. Homan 

Mrs. George F. Hutchins 

Mrs. William E. James 

Mr. C. Frederic Jellinghaus 

Mr. Frank Jones 

Mr. William H. Judd 

Miss A. May Keith 

Dr. Walter G. Kendall 

Miss Josie W. Kimball 

Miss Isabel S. Kingsbury 

Mrs. Horace B. Lang 



Mr. Louis K. Liggett 
Mr. Carl E. Lindquist 
Mrs. Martha Hatch Lingham 
Mrs. David M. Little 
Mrs. George W. Little 
Miss Laura Revere Little 
Mrs. Stephen B. Luce 
Mr. George B. Lyman 
Mrs. Helen B. Marshall 
Mr. Albert Matthews 
Miss Jessie H. McNicol 
Mr. John S. Meaney 
Miss Helen Mitchell 
Mrs. Charles A. Morss 
Mrs. E. Preble Motley, Sr. 
Mr. Howard AL Munroe 
Mrs. Philip Nichols 
Mr. Howard Noble 
Mr. William B. Northrup 
Mr. Ralph S. Norton 
Miss Eleanor S. Parker 
Mrs. Gustavus David Parker 
Mrs. Horatio A. Phinney 
Mr. F. C. Prouty 
Mr. Harry S. Rand 
Mrs. James W. Remick 
Mrs. MabeUe B. Rimbach 
Mrs. Harriott S. Rock 
Mr. Wilbur E. Rowell 
Mr. L. E. Ryther 
Mr. Fred C. Sanborn 
Miss Georgiana W. Sargent 
Miss Minnie L. Shedd 
Mrs. Willis S. Shepard 
Mrs. B. Farnham Smith 
Mrs. Henry P. Smith 
Mrs. Martha R. Smith 
Mr. F. A. Stanley 
Mrs. Eliot D. Stetson 
Mr. Irving H. Stewart 
Miss Frances L. Swett 
Mrs. Vernon B. Swett 
Mrs. J. F. Syme 
Mr. Richard Tanner 
Mrs. Leslie P. Thompson 
Mr. Augustus Thurgood 
Mr. George T. Till 
Miss Jessie L. Upham 
Mrs. Evie M. Vina] 
Miss Elsie H. A. Virgin 
Mr. Walter E. Walsh 
Miss Rachel B. White 
Mr. John K. Whiting 



52 



Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

1942 Lord Aberconway, North Wales, England 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Walter D. Brownell, Little Compton, Rhode Island 

1942 Alex Gumming, Bristol, Connecticut 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 A. T. De La Mare, New York, New York 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Arthur Herrington, Madison, New Jersey 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Fred H. Howard, Montebello, California 

1942 August Koch, Chicago, Illinois 

1942 Colonel R. H. Montgomery, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law Olmsted, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. Alfred Rehder, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1942 Dr. a. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 
1943 Edward I. Farrington, We}Tnouth, Massachusetts 
1943 Jens Jensen, Ellison Bay, Wisconsin 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. 0. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Fahnouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 

1945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1945 Theodore Wirth, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Dr. a. F. Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 

1947 James J. Hurley, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1947 Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Lancaster, England 

53 



54 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS 

1925 Rudolph D. Anste.ad, Bournemouth, England 

1889 Dr. L. H. Bailey, Ithaca. New York 

1911 Mr. W. J. Bean, 2 Mortlake Road, Kew, England 

1918 M. Desire Bois, Paris, France 

1925 I. H. BuRKiLL. F.L.S., "Clova," Fetcham Park, Leatherhead, 

England 
1921 Mr. Fred J. Chittenden, F.L.S., Vincent Square, Westmin- 
ster, London, England 
1925 WooN Young Chun, Sun Yat Sen University, Canton, South 

China 
1925 Henry F. duPont, Winterthur, Delaware 
1925 Pierre S. duPont, Wilmington, Delaware 
1925 Charles C. Eley, M.A., F.L.S., Suffolk, England 
1925 George Fr.\ser, Ucuelet. Vancouver Island, British Columbia, 

Canada 
1925 W \ G. Freeman, Esq., B.S.C., F.L.S., Imperial Institute, South 

Kensington, London, S. W. 7, England 
1918 Prof. N. E. Hansen, Brookings, South Dakota 
1911 Prof. U. P. Hedrick. Geneva, New York 
1925 Professor H. H. Hu. Fan Memorial Institute of Biology, 

Peking, China 
1925 Mrs. C. L. Hutchinson, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 
1925 Charles W. Knight, Oakdale, New York 
1921 Mr. C. E. Lane-Poole. Canberra, Australia 
1925 C. C. Laney, Rochester, New York 
1911 M. Emile Lemoine, Nancy, France 
1925 Sir J. S. Maxwell, Bart, K.T., PoUok House, near Glasgow, 

Scotland 
1918 J. Horace McFarl,\nd, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
1925 Mrs. William Mercer. Doylestown, Pennsylvania 
1925 Dr. Kingo Mitabe, Imperial University, Sepparo, Japan 
1898 Sir Frederick W. Moore, F.L.S., Willbrook House, Rath- 

farnham Co., Dublin. Ireland 
1918 Dr. George T. Moore, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, 

Missouri 
1925 F. Cleveland Morgan. Montreal, Quebec, Canada 
1925 M. L. Parde, Nogent-sur-Vernisson (Loiret), France 
1925 I. B. Pole-Evans, C.M.G., Chief of Division and Director, 

Botanical Survev, Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa 
1906 Sir David Pr.\in, F.R.S., C.M.G., F.L.S., Warlingham, Surrey, 

England 
1925 Miss Isabell-\ Preston. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 55 

1925 Johannes Rafn, Skovfrokontoret, Copenhagen, Denmark 

1906 Dr. Henry N. Ridley, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., M.A., Kew, 
Surrey, England 

1925 Camillo Schneider, c/o Gartenschonheit, Berlin-Westend, 
Germany 

1925 F. L. Skinner, Dropmore, Manitoba, Canada 

1925 Sir William Wright Smith, F.L.S., Royal Botanic Garden, 
Edinburgh, Scotland 

1893 Prof. William Trelease, Urbana, Illinois 

1925 Cyril T. White, Government Botanist, Brisbane, Queensland, 
Australia 

1921 Gurney Wilson, Secretary Royal Horticultural Society Or- 
chid Committee, Vincent Square, London, S. W. 1, England 

1925 John C. Wister, Arthur Hoyt Scott Foundation, Swarthmore 
College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 

1925 Sir Chad Woodward, Bewdley, Worcestershire, England 



An Increased Endowment 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society urgently requires addi- 
tions to its endowment fund. Income has been markedly decreased 
because of the forced exchange of high interest bonds for those 
carrying a lower rate of interest. In addition, recent developments 
in the national economy have caused many substantial increases in 
operation costs. 

The Trustees are adverse to curtailing the Society's activities. In 
fact, there is a greater demand for the Society's services than ever 
before and the organization is endeavoring to meet this multiplying 
popular demand. In addition to our many regular activities our 
program has been developed into various new fields of usefulness, 
such as services to war veterans buying new homes and wishing to 
develop their grounds properly. We have also undertaken a series 
of instructive meetings with school children. The gratifying response 
to these new activities is typical of the opportunity confronting this 
Society in the post war world. 

Without an increase in this Society's endowment, some of our 
work must be curtailed. This will be a great misfortune, not only 
because of consequent failure to meet the demands being made by 
the public but also because it will be the first negative action of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society in its 119 years of the practice 
of its official purpose: "the advancement of horticulture and kindred 
interests." 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

It is hoped by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that it will 
not be forgotten by members who find it expedient to make their 
wills. This Society's financial condition is sound and its investments 
are good, but the income from many of its investments has declined 
because of decreased returns from its bond holdings. Expenses 
naturally have increased and more money is needed to extend the 
activities of the Society. 

The following form of bequest is suggested: 
FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural 

Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees may 

direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various forms 
and for extending the activities of the Society along educa- 
tional lines. 

Signed 



J 



1948 

YEARBOOK 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 







nEC23 1948 

PRICE 50 CENTS 



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1948 FLOWER SHOWS 



w w w 

■^ ^:ir rir 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



JANUARY 29 and 30 



MARCH 15 to 20 



MAY 3 and 4 



MAY 20 and 21 



JUNE 13 and 14 



JULY 13 and 14 



AUGUST 19 and 20 



Camellia Show 

Spring Flower Show 

Daffodil Show 

Tulip Show 

Peonies, Iris, and Roses 

Lily Show 

Gladiolus Shoiv 



L 



AUGUST 25 and 26 

Exhibition of the Products of Children's Gardens 

OCTOBER 7-8-9 

Harvest Show — Chrysanthemums, House Plants 



NOYE_MBER 4-5-6-7 



Autumn Flower Show 



(DATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE) 




Fabian Bachrach 



Stedmax Buttrick 
Appointed treasurer. May 3, 1948 



1948 IJeu,- Eook 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 



Annual Reports for 1947 

and a List of 
Books Added to the Library 



FOREWORD 

The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the twenty-fifth number of 
the Society^s Year Book, with which are combined the 
annual reports for the year 1947. 

Boston, Mass. Ernest Hoftyzer 

June 15, 1948 Chairman 




George B. Cabot 
Elected trustee May S, 19^8 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 

President 

John S. Ames 

Vice-Presidents 

Aubrey B. Butler 

Dr. George O. Clark 

Trustees 

*JoHN S. Ames Ernest Hoftyzer (1950) 

* Aubrey B. Butler Walter Hunnewell (1951) 

George W. Butterworth (1949) Seth L. Kelsey (1951) 

*Stedman Buttrick Ray M. Koon (1950) 

George B. Cabot (1951) George Lewis, Jr. (1949) 

John Chandler (1949) Elmer D. Merrill (1950) 

*Dr. George O. Clark Mrs. William A. Parker (1951) 

Mrs. John Gardner Coolidge (1949) Harold S. Ross (1950) 
Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby (1949) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1951) 

Samuel J. Goddard (1950) *Edwin S. Webster 

Honorary Trustee 
Oakes Ames 

Treasurer 
Stedman Buttrick 

Assistant Treasurer 
George Lewis, Jr. 

Secretary 
Arno H. Nehrling 

* Members ex-offi,cio. Dates given are those of expiration of terms. 

5 




John Chandler 

Elected trustee May 3, 1H8 



(^ontentd 



Officers for 1948 5 

Committees for 1948 9 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1947 11 

Garden Committee Awards 23 

Special Medal Awards 25 

Books Added to the Library 

Between May 1, 1947 and May 1, 1948 27 

Benevolent Fruit and Flower Mission Report 34 

Annual Meeting 35 

The President's Address 35 

The Secretary's Report 37 

Exhibitions Committee Report 40 

Committee on Prizes Report 43 

Committee on the Exhibitions of the Products 

of Children's Gardens Report 44 

Library Committee Report 46 

The Treasurer's Report 47 

Result of the Balloting 48 

Necrology 49 

Honorary Members 50 

Corresponding Members 51 

An Increased Endowment 52 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 53 

7 




Seth L. Kelsey 

Elected trustee May S, 1H8 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 2, 19^9 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

John S. Ames, Chairman 



Aubrey B. Butler 
Stedman Buttrick 



Stedman Buttrick 



Aubrey B. Butler 
Stedman Buttrick 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
John S. Ames, Chairman 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

John S. Ames, Chairman 



Dr. George O. Clark 
Edwin S. Webster 



Walter Hunnewell 



Dr. George O. Clark 
Walter Hunnewell 



John Chandler 



Edwin S. Webster 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Ray M. Koon, Chairman 

Ernest Hoftyzer 

COMMITTEE ON EXHIBITIONS 

Elmer D. Merrill, Chairman 
George W. Butterworth Mrs. William A. Parker 

Ray M. Koon Harold D. Stevenson 

COMMITTEE ON PRIZES 

Samuel J. Goddard, Chairman 

Thomas Milne, Co-Chairman 

Ernest Borowski George B. Cabot 

Walter Hunnewell 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY 

Elmer D. Merrill, Chairman 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby Mrs. Susan Mckelvey 

George Lewis, Jr. Mrs. Roger S. Warner 

COMMITTEE ON LECTURES AND PUBLICATIONS 

Ernest Hoftyzer, Chairman 

John Chandler Ray M. Koon 

COMMITTEE ON SPECIAL MEDALS 

Harold S. Ross, Chairman 
Aubrey B. Butler 
Samuel J. Goddard 

COMMITTEE ON GARDENS 
Dr. George O. Clark, Chairman 
Mrs. John G. Coolidge 
Seth L. Kelsey 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING 
John S. Ames, Chairman 
George W. Butterworth 

COMMITTEE ON CHILDREN'S GARDENS EXHIBITIONS 

Samuel J. Goddard, Chairman 
Daniel W. O'Brien Mrs. Henry D. Tudor 

COMMITTEE ON THE ALBERT C. BURRAGE GOLD VASE 

Harold S. Ross, Chairman 
Albert C. Burrage, Jr. 
Mrs. John G. Coolidge 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Samuel J. Goddard 
Ernest Hoftyzer 

Harold S. Ross 



Seth L. Kelsey 
Elmer D. Merrill 



George Lewis, Jr. 
Harold S. Ross 



Stedman Buttrick 



Elmer D. Merrill 
Thomas Milne 

Ray M. Koon 
Elmer D. Merrill 



tl/ledaid and L^ertificateS ^^ warded in 1947 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Sherman Eddy, Avon, Connecticut, for the most outstanding exhibit in 1947. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland jMedal 

Eric Waltherof Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, for skill in horticulture. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 

Professor M. A. Blake of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, for the 
development of new peaches. 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Ernest Borowski of Norwood, for his skill in the propagation and hybridizing of 
azaleas. 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Stedman Buttrick of Concord, for his unusual collection of iris and the outstanding 
manner in which he maintains his garden and estate. 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

John L. Russell of Dedham, for his naturalistic planting of narcissus. 

Silver Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

H. Wendell Endicott of Dedham, for his extensive planting of tulips. 

President's Cup 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., North Abington, for a formal garden with house at the 
Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the Horticultural Society of New York 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for a group of acacias at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
Mrs. Helen Adams, Wellesley, for cypripediums showing the highest degree of culture 
at the Spring Show. 

The George Holliday Memorial Prize 

William Todd, North Uxbridge, for a group of clivias at the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Club 

Winter Gardeners, for a greenhouse and sun-heated pit at the Spring Show. 

Trophy of the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc. — Kelsey-Highlands Nursery, East Boxford, for an informal 
garden at the Spring Show. 

11 




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MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES — Continued 13 

Sarah Todd Bulkley Gold Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Chestnut Hill, co-chairman of the Garden Clubs' Exhibitions 
Committee, for her plan of the exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Book: Thomas Jefferson's Garden Book Edited by Edwin Morris Betts 

Dr. George O. Clark, Boston, for the camellia Hermes, best bloom in the Show. 

Crystal Vases 
Harold S. Ross, Hingham, for the Mendel tulip — Her Grace, best bloom in the 

Show. 
Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for the daffodil Therapia, best bloom in the Show. 

Gold Medals 

Lord Aberconway, London, England, for an exhibit of white cypripediums at the 

Spring Show. 
L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids. 
Woodbury M. Bartlett, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Bay State Nurseries, for a formal garden with house at the Spring Show. 
Bobbink and Atkins, Rutherford, New Jersey (at New York), for the best garden in 

the Show. 
Ernest Borowski, for an educational exhibit of new hybrid seedling azaleas. 
Ernest Borowski, for new hybrid azaleas at the Spring Show, 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of clivias at the Spring Show. 
Breck's, for a Spring border. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden with fountain and pool at the Spring 

Show. 
Sherman W. Eddy, Avon, Connecticut, for a naturalistic exhibit — Vermont covered 

bridge at the Spring Show. 
The Garden Clubs' Exhibitions Committee (Mrs. James Perkins, 2nd and Mrs. 

Irving C. Wright, co-chairmen), for a contemporary house and garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Chester Cook and Mrs. Paul 

Wadleigh, co-chairmen), for flower arrangements at the Spring Show. 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for a chrysanthemum garden. 
Gladhaven (Pasquale Vasaturo), for a display of gladiolus. 
Albert A. Hulley, for a Summer garden at the Spring Show. 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., Kelsey-Highlands Nursery, for an informal garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Lexington Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Magnolia Nurseries, for an exhibit of tuberous-rooted begonias. 
The Merrys, for a collection of daffodils. 

Mt. Auburn Cemetery, for a Memorial garden at the Spring Show. 
New England Carnation Growers Association, for a display of carnations at the 

Spring Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dana Osgood, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, for an exhibit of out- 
door grown camellias. 
Mrs. Robert Treat Paine, 2nd, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 
John L. Russell, for a display of daffodils. 

Professor A. P. Saunders, Clinton, N. Y., for a display of peonies. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of acacias at the Spring Show. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. James E. Whitin, for a group of clivias at the Spring Show. 




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MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES — Continued 15 

Silver Medals 

Mrs. Thomas Barbour, for a display of vegetables. 

Woodbury M. Bartlett, for an old-fashioned chrysanthemum garden. 

Bay vState Nurseries, for a border of garden chrysanthemums. 

Boyce Thompson Institute, Yonkers, New York, for Lilium auratum X L. japoni- 

cum (Seedlings). 
Mrs. J. Cameron Bradley, for a display of camellias. 

Breck's, for a border of tuberous-rooted begonias and garden chrysanthemums. 
Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 
Breck's, for a hardy border featuring lilies. 

Breck's, for a display of perennials featuring Lilium umbellatum. 
Bristol County Agricultural School, for a demonstration greenhouse at the Spring 

Show. 
Butterworth's, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Champlain View Gardens, Burlington, Vermont, for a display of gladiolus. 
Dr. George O. Clark, for a display of rhododendrons — cut branches. 
Frost & Higgins Company, for an outdoor living-room at the Spring Show. 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for a display of fruits and vegetables. 
Edgar L. Kline, Lake Grove, Oregon, for a display of lilium regale types. 
Mrs. Franklin P. Lowry, for the highest total number of points in the Iris Show. 
New England Rose Society, for an educational rose exhibit. 
North Street Greenhouses (Ernest K. Logee), Danielson, Connecticut, for an 

exhibit of begonias. 
Oregon Bulb Farms, Sandy, Oregon, for a collection of hybrid trumpet lilies. 
Mrs. Robert Treat Paine, 2nd, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Patten & Company, for a display of carnations. 
Mrs. Robert W. Sayles, for a display of daffodils. 

Seabrook Nurseries, Seabrook, New Hampshire, for a display of gladiolus. 
Miss Eleonora R. Sears, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Van's Nursery and Landscape Service, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 
Waltham Field Station, for Pacific Coast hybrid delphiniums. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids. 
William Wenk, for a display of delphiniums. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Winter Gardeners, for a greenhouse and sun-heated pit at the Spring Show. 
Wyman's Framingham Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Bronze Medals 

Boston Mycological Club, for edible and poisonous mushrooms. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for an exhibit of cacti. 

Alexander Irving Heimlich, for a rock garden at the Spring Show. 

Walter Hunnewell, for rhododendrons — cut branches. 

Mrs. Franklin P. Lowry, for the finest stalk in the Iris Show — Iris Syringa 

Urst Class Certificates 

Azalea Mrs. John S. Ames, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Daphne, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Dexter's Springtime, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Dorothy Nehrling, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Gigantea, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Glamour Girl, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 




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MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES ~- Continued 17 

Azalea Noel, exhibited by Ernest Borowski, 
Azalea White Cap, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Brassolaeliocattleya Eucharama, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cattleya Silver Moon, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cymbidium Berengeria var. Rosy Dawn, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 
Cymbidium Titrianae Old Dog Kennel var., exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Com- 
pany. 
Lilium Dunkirk, exhibited by F. L. Skinner. 
Orchid General Wavell, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 
Peony Cecilia, exhibited by Professor A. P. Saunders. 
Peony Julia Grant, exhibited by Professor A. P. Saundeis. 
Peony Ludovica, exhibited by Professor A. P. Saunders. 
Peony Sophie, exhibited by Professor A. P. Saunders. 

Awards of Merit 

Azalea Chailey (Macrantha hj^brid), exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Crystal, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Dorothy Nehrling, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Ember, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Fragrans, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Schneewitchen, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Super White, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Sylvia, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Brassolaeliocattleya Nanette alba, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 

Carnation Sylvia, exhibited by Patten & Company. 

New arcticum hybrid chrysanthemum Punchinello, exhibited by Colprit's Nursery 

and Seed Farm. 
Chrysanthemum Governor Dewey, exhibited by Cummings the florist. 
Clematis Tops, exhibited by Dr. George O. Clark. 

Cypripedium Doris Black (Venus X Actba), exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 
Cypripedium Festarno, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Mabellsey, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Fortunei hybrid seedling of No. 9 Esoteric, exhibited by Dr. George O. Clark. 
Marigold Naughty Marietta, exhibited by W. Atlee Burpee Company. 
Peony Alexander Wolcott, exhibited by Professor A. P. Saunders. 
Peony Cardinal's Robe, exhibited by Professor A. P. Saunders. 
Rose Thor, exhibited by James R. C-ass. 

Votes of Commendation 

Begonia Semperflorens, exhibited by North Street Greenhouses (Ernest K. Logee) 

Brassolaeliocattleya Midenette var. Sunset, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Com- 
pany. 

Carnation Linda, exhibited by A. Sorensen. 

Seedling hardy chrysanthemums, exhibited by The Merrys. 

New Clematis (Lanuginosa) hybrid — Purity, exhibited by Dr. George O. Clark. 

Lilium Helen Carroll, exhibited by Mrs. Helen Carroll Harris Harris. 

Lilium Meiling, exhibited by Carleton Yerex. 

Lilium Waltham, exhibited by Carleton Yerex. 

New extra early muskmelon Granite State (University of New Hampshire var.), 
exhibited by Colprit's Nursery and Seed Farm. 

Petunia Mrs. Dwight Eisenhower, exhibited by W. Atlee Burpee Company. 

Phlox Tetra Red, exhibited by W. Atlee Burpee Company. 

Giant radishes, exhibited by Max Shoolman. 




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MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES — Continued 19 

Scilla campanulata Queen of the Pinks, exhibited by Breck's. 
Scilla campanulata Rhineland, exhibited by Breck's. 
Double snapdragon Meadowcroft, exhibited by C. H, Lothrop. 
Cottage Tulip, Flag of War, exhibited by Harold S. Ross. 

Cultural Certificates 

L. Sherman Adams Company, for Vanda coerulea. 

Peter Arnott, for a group of cascade chrysanthemums. 

Peter Arnott, for chrysanthemum'standard Fireball. 

Peter Arnott, for Dendrobium Louis Bleriot. 

Benson & Young, Inc., for a group of cyclamen. 

Ernest Borowski, for an exhibit of new hybrid azaleas. 

Ernest Borowski, for a group of Croft lilies. 

Dr. P. A. Campobasso, for an exhibit of Passiflora. 

James R. Cass, for a display of climbing roses. 

Thomas L. Galvin, for a display of small-flowered dahlias. 

Sargent Griffin, for tuberous-rooted begonias. 

Kenneth Houghton, for a display of pyrethrums. 

Albert A. Hulley, for an exhibit of clematis. 

James J. Hurley, for Pacific Coast hybrid delphiniums. • 

Stewart Johnson, for a group of acacias. 

George Palmer, for a group of fuchsias. 

George Palmer, for Primula malacoides. 

George Palmer, for Darwin tulip Glacier. 

Trombla Bros., for intermediate p>ompon chrysanthemums. 

Waltham Field Station, for Pacific Coast hybrid delphiniums. 

Vote of Thanks 

American Iris Society (New England Region), for Siberian Iris and pool. 

Arnold Arboretum, for Forsythia Arnold Dwarf. 

Arnold Arboretum, for Forsythia Arnold Giant. 

Arnold .\rboretum, for Prunus subhirtella (dwarf long-blooming cherry). 

Mrs. Gloria Bertocci, for an exhibit of beets. 

Mrs. J. Kenton Billingsley, for an arrangement of hardy chrysanthemums. 

Mrs. J. Kenton Billingsley, for an arrangement of pussy willows. 

Ernest Borowski, for a vase of chrysanthemimi Pomponette. 

The Boston Aquarium Society, Inc., for a display of aquaria. 

Bureau of Plant Industry, Beltsville, Maryland, for chrysanthemum seedlings. 

Mrs. Louis Curtis, for an exhibit of King Alfred daffodils. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist — Boston, for an exhibit of Mother's Day tulips. 

Mrs. Mortimer J. Fox, for an exhibit of alliums. 

Ernest Goldthwaite, for cabbage var. Penn State. 

Kenneth Houghton, for an exhibit of new flowers. 

Walter Hunnewell, for hybrid rhododendrons — cut branches. 

Carl F. Moore, for an exhibit of Chinese chestnuts. 

Louis Vasseur, for an exhibit of clematis novelties. 

Waltham Field Station, for new hybrid garden lily originated by F. L. Skinner and 

grown by Harold E. White. 
Mrs. Marcia Weld, for a Guatemala treasure — a Highlands Garden from the Land 

of Eternal Spring. 
Miss Lucy M. Wheeler, for Chinese lanterns. 

Honorable ^Mention 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, for an exhibit of house plants. 
New England Begonia Society, for an educational exhibit demonstrating the propa- 
gation and growing of house plants. 
W^eston Nurseries, for an exhibit of rhododendrons and iris. 










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L^af*clen (committee ^y^wards 

The Board of Trustees awarded the followmg medals on the recommen- 
dation of the Committee on Gardens : 

The Society's Gold Medal to Mr. Stedman Buttrick for his estate at 
Concord, Mass. The grounds of this establishment have been laid out with 
much skill and the gardens have been brought to and maintained at a high 
degree of culture. Mr. Buttrick's collections of rare iris, one of the outstand- 
ing features of the gardens, have special interest not only for their charm 
and beauty but also for the many varieties of iris assembled. 

The Society's Gold Medal to Mr, John Russell of Dedham, Mass., for his 
most remarkable planting of narcissus. Naturalistic in design and accom- 
plishment, Mr. Russell's planting consists of thousands upon thousands of 
narcissi of several himdred varieties on acres of almost untouched old 
pasture. The narcissi are established in drifts in the open areas, planted 
skillfully about the bases of birches, maples and other trees as well as being 
most beautifully grouped around the shores of a pond and along the banks 
of a little brook. The garden is emphatically one of the best examples of 
the use of Spring bulbs in a naturalistic planting in the country. 

The Society's Silver Medal to Mr. H. Wendell Endicott of Dedham, 
Mass., for the very beautiful and extensive planting of tulips of many 
varieties in his gardens. Great care is exhibited in culture as well as great 
taste in the selection and combination of colors. 

George Lewis, Jr. 
Chairman 



23 







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Special II lUedai ^^ wards 

At the meeting of the Board of Trustees on January 21, 1948, several 
medals were awarded on the recommendation of the Special Medals Com- 
mittee, Mr. Harold S. Ross, Chairman. 

The GEORGE ROBERT WHITE MEDAL OF HONOR for service 
to horticulture was awarded to Mr. Ernest F. Coe, a resident of Coconut 

Grove, Florida. Mr. Coe is 
known as the father of Ever- 
glades National Park, which 
has recently been opened by 
the United States National 
Park Service. This Park 
preserves a large area of vir- 
gin land rich in the flora and 
fauna of subtropical Amer- 
ica. The establishment of the 
Park came about only be- 
cause of many years of sac- 
rificial effort on the part of 
Mr. Coe. He devoted prac- 
tically his entire adult life 
to the project. It was the 
opinion of the Committee 
that this outstanding honor 
was richly deserved by Mr. 
Coe, who is now in his 81st 
year. 

The THOMAS ROLAND 
MEDAL for skill in horti- 
culture was awarded to Mr. 
Eric Walther of Golden 
Gate Park, San Francisco, 
California. Mr. Walther has 
accomplished a most re- 
markable undertaking in his 
assembling of a beautiful 
collection of native and ex- 
otic plants in a new botanic 
garden of seven acres. His 
knowledge of plants is great, 
and he has demonstrated 
rare ability in their arrange- 
ment for park study and 
enjoyment. 

25 




Ernest F. Cue 




Eric Walther 



26 



RECIPIEXTS OF SPECIAL MEDALS 




The JACKSON DAWSON :MEDAL for skill in hybridization and prop- 
agation of plants was awarded to Dr. M. A. Blake of the New Jersey 

Agricultural Experiment 
Station. Li the opinion of 
the Committee, Dr. Blake 
was outstandingly deserv-ing 
of this honor. He worked 
with fruits for many years 
and specialized in the devel- 
opment of peaches. The new 
varieties of this fruit which 
he created Uterally vitalized 
peach-growing all over 
America. Li connection with 
this award, the Committee, 
which acts in an ad^^so^y 
capacity to the Board of 
Trustees, the body which 
actually grants the honors, 
feels it desirable to point 
out that the recommenda- 
tion was made on December 
17, 1947 at a time when the 
Committee was not aware 
that Dr. Blake had died suddenly three days before. At a subsequent com- 
mittee meeting, the problem of making a posthumous award was raised 
but it was determined to present the recommendation to the Trustees. The 
Trustees accepted the recommendation and awarded the medal to Dr. 
Blake's heirs. It is presently understood that the heirs have presented the 
medal to the New Jersey Ex]>eriment Station, where Dr. Blake carried 
on his work so successfully. 

The LAEGE GOLD ^lED.AL of the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety for skiU in horticulture was awarded to Mr. Ernest Borowski of 
Norwood, Massachusetts. This singular honor was given to him because 
of the skill he has demonstrated in the propagation of plants; especially 
for his success in propagating and hybridizing azaleas. Mr. Borowski is 
considered the outstanding authority on the culture of greenhouse azaleas 
in the L'nited States. For many years in addition to his seedlings, he main- 
tained a collection of the finest varieties available at home and abroad. 
These plants were forced to p>erfection for the various exhibitions of the 
Society. Mr. Borowski has been a consistent prize winner. His Gold and 
Silver Medals. Gold Medal Certificates, First Class Certificates and Cul- 
tural awards are too numerous to mention. 



31. 



(ISoon5 ^^dded to trie oLlbi^aru 

MAY 1, 1947-MAY 1, 1948 

This list is arranged as a supplement to the 
catalogue. Members are urged to make use of it. 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Best, A. C. The little farm in the big city. 1947 

Ellis, C. & Swaney, M. W. Soilless growth of plants; 2d ed. rev. by T. 

Eastwood. 1947 
Free, M. Gardening; rev. ed. 1947 
Gamer, R. J. Propagation by cuttings and layers . . . with special 

reference to pome fruits. 1947 
Garris, E. W. & Hoffmann, G. P. Southern horticulture enterprises; 3d ed. 

1946 
Hardy, J. & Foxman, S. Food production in the school garden. 1940 
Hastings, L. The southern garden. 1948 

Korn, M. N. Here's how to garden in the Fort Worth area. 1947 
Miller, L. K. Children's gardens for school and home. 1904 
Vernalization and phasic development of plants. 1935 
Virginia. Negro garden club. Handbook. 1943 
Wister, J. C, ed. The Woman's home companion garden book. 1947 

History 
American ass'n for the advancement of science. Liebig and after Liebig, a 

century of progress in agricultural chemistry. 1942 
Buel, J. Jesse Buel, agricultural reformer: selections from his writings, 

ed. by H. J. Carman. 1947 
Deering, F. U.S.D.A., manager of American agriculture. 1945 
Harding, T. S. Two blades of grass : a history of scientific development 

in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 1947 
Hosmer, R. S. The Cornell Plantations, a history. 1947 
Krelage, E. H. Drie eeuwen bloembollenexport : de geschiedenis van 

den bloembollenhandel en der hollandsche bloembollen tot 1938 
Straaten van Nes, J. H., & Moerlands, C. P. Boskoop in its historical 

development as a center of nurseries. 1924 
Wyman, D. Arboretums and botanical gardens of North America. 1947 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Soils 

Barrett, T. J. Harnessing the earthworm. 1948 

Collings, G. H. Commercial fertilizers, their sources and use; 4th ed. 1947 

27 



28 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Faulkner, E. H. A second look [sequel to Plowman's Folly] 1947 
Gamer, H. V. Profit from fertilizers; 2d rev. ed. 1945 
Howard, L. E. The earth's greeu carpet. 1947 
King, F. C. Gardening with compost. 1944 

Diseases and Pests 
Bnies, C. T. Insects and human welfare; rev. ed. 1947 
Chester, K. S. Nature and prevention of plant diseases; 2d ed. 1947 
Cook, M. T. Viruses and virus diseases of plants. 1947 
Stiles, W. Trace elements in plants and animals. 1947 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 

Hills, L. D. Miniature alpine gardening. 1946 

Men's garden club of Salem, Oregon. Hobby gardener's guide. 1946 

Mueller, C. H. Bulbs for beauty. 1947 

Scruggs, Mrs. G. R., ed. Gardening in the south and west; ed. 3. 1947 

Monographs 

Allen, R. C. Roses for every garden. 1948 

American iris society. The iris, an ideal hardy perennial. 1948 

Cox, J. M. A cultural table of orchidaceous plants. 1946 

Da'sds, B. A. Azaleas and camellias for the garden. 1947 

Gilbert, P. A. The charm of growing orchids. 1946 

Ingram, C. Ornamental cherries. 1948 

Jacobsen, H. Succulent plants . . . other than cacti; trans, by V. 

Higgins; 2d ed. 1946 
Krauss, H. Begonias for American homes and gardens. 1947 
McFarland, J. H. Modern roses III. 1947 
McFarland, J. H. Roses of the world in color; 3d ed. 1948 
Osorio, L. F. Orquideas colombianas: Colombian orchids. 1941 
Otten, G. Tuberous- rooted begonias and their culture; 2d ed. 1947 
Riley, M. T. Dahlias, what is known about them. 1947 
Scott, E. L. & A. H. Chrysanthemums for pleasure. 1947 
Stephenson, E. E. Everlasting flowers: practices employed in propagation 

and processing, including dehydration. 1947 
White, E. A. American orchid culture; 3d ed. 1947 
Wilson, H. V. P. The African violet. 1948 

ECONOMIC PLANTS 

Vegetables 

Crabb, R. Hybrid-coni makers: prophets of plenty. 1947 

Morrison, G. Quick freezing and family food gardening. 1948 

Rohde, E. S. Uncommon vegetables. 1943 

Shoemaker, J. S. Vegetable growing. 1947 

Spencer, A. P. Florida vegetables. 1937 

Sunset magazine. Vegetable gardening book. 1947 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 29 

Herbs 

Carter, A. B. In an herb garden. 1947 

Mazza, I. G. Herbs for the kitchen; 2d ed. 1947 

Webster, H. N. Herbs, how to grow them and how to use them; ed. 4. 1947 

Fruit 

Dahlgren, B. E. Tropical and subtropical fruits. 1947 
Shoemaker, J. S. Small-fruit culture; 2d ed. 1948 
Southwick, L. Dwarf fruit trees. 1947 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Bath, G. H. America's Williamsburg, 1946 

Bottomley, M. E. New designs of small properties. 1948 

Chamberlain, S. Behold Williamsburg. 1947 

Champion, P. V. Attractive lawn furnishings, 1947 

Friend, W. H. Plants of ornamental value, Rio Grande Valley, Texas. 

1942 
Johnson, L. R. How to landscape your grounds. 1948 
McHatton, T. H. Armchair gardening. 1947 
Menninger, E. A. Flowering tropical trees. 1947 

ECONOMICS 

Clissold, E. J. The seed industry, 1946 

Brantley, C. O. Opportunities in liorticulture. 1947 

Kift, R. The retail flower shop. 1980 

Surtees, J. Landscaping master units, series 2 & 3. 1947 

AGRICULTURE 

Country Life 

Booth, E. T. Country life in America as lived by ten Presidents of the 

United States. 1947 
Future farmers of America. Official manual. 1943 
Gustafson, A. F. Land for the family, a guide to country living. 1947 
Hahnel, E. S. Down to earth. 1947 

Hall, B. The garden yard, a handbook of intensive farming. 1909 
Pearson, H. S. Successful part-time farming. 1947 
Robinson, E. & C. The "Have-more" plan. 1946 
Sherman, H. M. Call of the land. 1947 

Conservation 

Graham, E. H. The land and wildlife. 1947 

Lillard, R. G. The great forest. 1947 

Parker, B. M. Saving our wildlife. 1944 

Pfeiffer, E. The earth's face and human destiny. 1947 

Sears, P. B. Deserts on the march; 2d ed. rev. 1947 



30 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Bees 

Grout, R. A., ed. The hive and the honeybee : a new book ... to succeed 

"Langstroth on the hive and the honeybee" 1946 
Pellett, F. C. American honey plants; ed 4. rev. and enl. 1947 

BOTANY 

General 

Camp, W.H., Rickett, H.W., & Weatherby, C.A., ed. International 

rules of botanical nomenclature; special ed. 1947 
Emerson, F. W. Basic botany. 1947 

Murrill, W. A. Historic foundations of botany in Florida. 1945 
Piatt, R. Our flowering world. 1947 
Zim, H. S. Plants, a guide to hobbies. 1947 

Anatomy, Physiology, Ecology 

Arber, A. Goethe's botany. 1946 

Fames, A. J. & McDaniels, L. H. Introduction to plant anatomy; rev. ed. 

1947 
Avery, G. S. Jr. Hormones and horticulture; the use of special chemicals 

in the control of plant growth. 1947 
Crocker, W. Growth of plants : twenty years research at Boyce Thompson 

Institute. 1948 
Daubenmire, R. F. Plants and environment. 1947 
Holm, T. Contributions to tlie knowledge of the germination of some 

North American plants. 1891 
Mitchell, J. W. & Marth, P. C. Growth regulators for garden, field and 

orchard. 1947 
Salisbury, E. J. The reproductive capacity of plants, 1942 
Weatherwax, P. Plant biology; 2d ed. 1947 

Herbals 

Ferrari, G. B. De florum cultura libri IV. 1633 
Fuchs, L. New kreuterbuch. 1543. Faksimiledruck 1938 
Pseudo-Apuleius. The Herbal of Pseudo-Apuleius from the 9th century 
MS in the Abbey of Monte Cassino . . . with the first printed ed., 
both in facsimile, annotated by F. W. T. Hunger. 1935 
Rufinus. The Herbal of Rufinus, ed. by L. Thorndike. 1945 

Monographs 

Babcock, E. B. The genus crepis. 1947. 2 vols. 

Benson, L. [and others] The cacti of Arizona. 1940 

Jones, G. N. American species of Amelanchier. 1946 

Kelly, J. P. Genetical study of Phlox drummondi. 1920 

McKelvey, S. D. Yuccas of the southwestern United States, part 2. 1947 

Nearing, G. G. The lichen book. 1942-1946 

Stern, F. C. A study of the genus Paeonia. 1946 

Van Melle, R. J. Review of Juniperus chinensis et al. 1947 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 31 

Wolf, F, A. & F. T. The fungi: an introduction to their structure, classi- 
fication, activities and natural economy. 1947. 2 vols. 

Floras 
Ayre, A. M. Wild flowers of Newfoundland. 1935 
Baker, R. St. B. The redwoods. 1944 

Benson, L. D. Manual of southwestern desert trees and shrubs. 1945 
Bergen, J. Y. Key and flora, northeastern and central states; rev. and 

enl. 1908 
Clement, E. S. Flowers of prairie and woodland [of the central U. S.] 1947 
Compton, R. H., ed. Our South African flora. 
Edlin, H. J. British woodland trees. 1944 
Grigson, G. Wild flowers in Britain. 1944 
Harlow, W. M. Twig key to the deciduous woody plants of eastern North 

America; 4th rev. ed. 1946 
Hausman, E. H. The illustrated encyclopedia of American wild flowers. 

1947 
Osbom, H. S. Plants of the Holy Land with their fruits and flowers. 1859 
Stevenson, N. I. Pocket guide to 60 distinctive tropical trees cultivated 

in the open in the United States. 1933 
Tatnall, R. R. Flora of Delaware and the eastern shore. 1946 
Wherry, E. T. Wild flowers of the northeastern and midland states. 1948 
Wiegand, K. N. & Foxworthy, F. W\ Key to genera of woody plants in 

winter; ed. 3. 1908. 

NATURE STUDY 

Gexeral 

Bedichek, R. Adventures with a Texas naturalist. 1947 
Nature magazine. Nature on parade. 1947 
Pettit, T. Book of nature hobbies. 1947 

Wonders of nature: how animals and plants live and behave in relation 
to their natural surroundings. 1945 

Brans 
Hudson, W. H, British birds 
Lemmon, R. S. How to attract the birds; planting, feeding, housing. 

1947 
Sharpe, R. B. Wonders of the bird world. 1898 

BIOGRAPHY 

Bakeless, J. Lewis and Clark, partners in discovery. 1947 

Gilmour, J. British botanists. 1944 

Harvey, A. G. Douglas of the fir: a biography of David Douglas, botanist. 

1947 
Howard, W^. L. Luther Burbank, a victim of hero worship. 1946 

ESSAYS 
Alsop, G. F. April in the branches. 1947 

Ayscough, F. A Chinese mirror: being reflections of the reality behind 
appearance. 



3^2 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Greenberg, D. B., ed. Countryman's companion: a treasury of farm lit- 
erature from ancient to modem times. 1947 
King, C. B. This was ever in mj' dream. 1947 
Perelman, S. J. Acres and pains. 1947 
Pryor, W. C. The lazy gardener. 1947 
Smith, A. Books and gardens. 1947 
Tyrrell, M. L. The affairs of Nicholas Culpeper. 1947 
Wilson, E. W. The gourd m folk literature. 1947 

FINE ARTS 

General 

Bing, S., comp. Artistic Japan, nos. 1-25. May 1888- June 1890. 

Brod, F, Flowers in nature and design. 1947 

Cole, R. V. The artistic anatomy of trees. 1925 

Cory, H. E. Significance of beauty in nature and art. 1947 

Horst, H. P., illus. Patterns from nature, photos by Horst. 1946 

Flower Arrangement 

Biddle, D. and Blom, D. Flower arrangement for everyone. 1947 

Ishimoto, T. Art of flower arrangement. 1947 

Oneal, C. M. Flower arrangements of the Americas. 1947 

Rockwell, F. F. & Grayson, E. C. Complete book of flower arrangement. 

1947 
Rogers, M. Flower arrangement, a hobby for all. 1948 
Soules, K. Modern florist designing. 

Taber, G. and Kistner, R. Flower arranging for the American home. 1947 
Tsujii, K. The mastery of Japanese flower arrangement, trans, by 

Bunsho Jugaku and Keiichi Fujii. 1940 
Vogue in flowers; 7th ed. 1947 

TRAVEL 

Butcher, D. Exploring our national parks and monuments. 1947. 
Fairchild, D. The world grows round my door. 1947 
Peattie, R., ed. Sierra Nevada, the range of light. 1947 
Russell, C. P. One hundred years in Yosemite. 1947 
Yeager, D. G. Your western national parks. 1947 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with 
thanks gifts to the Library from the following donors: 

Burrage Estate. 

A large collection of works on horticulture and plant hunting 
Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R. 

Our South African flowers, ed. by R. H. Compton. 
King, T. S. 

Alpenblumenfibel; 4te aufl. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 33 

Krelage, E. H. 

Drie eeuwen bloembollenexport . . . tot 1938. 
McKelvey, Mrs. S. D. 

Key to genera of woody plants in winter; ed. 3, by K. M. Wiegand and 
F. W. Foxworthy 
Nehrling, a. H. 

A collection of works on horticulture 
Paige, C. H. 

Nursery catalogues from the firm of Haage and Schmidt 
Philbrook, Mrs. Lawrence 

R. H. Shumway's garden guide for 1893 
Spruance, Edith 

Flora of Delaware and the eastern shore, by R. R. Tatnall. 
Stearns, Mrs. Foster. 

De florum cultura libri IV, by G. B. Ferrari 
Trinity Parish Library, Boston. 

Plants of the Holy Land with their fruits and flowers. 
WiNFiELD, Mrs. James E. 

British birds, by W. H. Hudson 

Wonders of the bird world, by R. B. Sharpe 



(/.Senevolent ^ratcrnilu ^ruit and 
Slower riflidsion 

The Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission will begin on 
June 1st its SOtii year of continuous service and the -^^th year that its 
headquarters have been estabhshed in the basement of Horticultural 
Hall. We again wish to express our thanks and gratitude to the Trustees 
and we appreciate the friendly interest and cooperation of Mr. Xehrling. 

In the summer of 1947, we received at our four Centres 77-i hampers, 
cartons, etc.. from 31 towns. This was a gain of 18-2 over the year before 
and next to the highest total of 776 in 1941. 

Duxbury, North Grafton. Harvard, Grafton. Lexington, Xeedham, 
Soituate, Hanover, W inchester, Westboro, Hingham. WoUaston, Groton, 
Arlington. Lincoln. Hopkinton, Beverly and North Andover had a 100^^ 
record. Way land, Cohasset. Peabody, Weston, Sharon and Newton Centre 
missed only one week. Duxbury was the banner town sending in by express 
direct to the Centre 90 hamp>ers. cartons, etc. North Grafton was second 
and Harvard third. 

Five hundred and fifty-three individuals were reached at Thanksgi\*ing, 
Christmas and Easter with baskets, gift trays, extra gifts, etc. This was 
the largest in our history* and 115 more than last year. 

The following garden clubs contributed generously to our hohday 
work: WoUaston Garden Club, Newton Centre Garden Club. Southern 
Brookline Garden Club. Lexington Field and Garden Club. Grafton Gar- 
den Club. Hopkinton Garden Club, Hingham Garden Club, Greenwood 
Garden Club. Junior League Garden Club and Needham Garden Club. 

Mrs. Geoffrey G. \Miitney kindly donated 30 tickets to the Spring 
Flower Show for our special recipients who otherwise would not have been 
able to attend. This brought them a great deal of joy and also a lasting 
pleasure. 

' Flowers from the different shows have been sent to many shut-ins. 
hospital wards and institutions. 

The Fruit and Flower Mission is grateful to all of their many friends 
who make it possible to carry on this work. 

Ethel E. Hudson 
Execuiite Secretary 



34 



r^eportd ojf KJfficeir5 and (committees 

Presented at the 
ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 3, 1948 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
held at Horticultural Hall at 3:00 P.M. on May 3, 1948, with the President, 
Mr. John S. Ames in the chair. He appointed Mr. Edwin F. Steffek, Miss 
Faith Freeman and Miss Claire Sabadini as tellers. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the executive secretary, read the call for the 
meeting. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous annual 
meeting was waived. Mr. Ames then presented his annual presidential 
address. 

ZJIte J-^reslaenl 6 ^y^dareSd 

The outstanding development of the Society during 1947 was a really 
remarkable increase in membership. We have now close to 11,000 members. 
This is not only the largest membership this Society has enjoyed in its long 
history, but I believe is the largest single annual increase in any one year. 
More than 2,500 new members were added during the twelve months. This 
is a most gratifying development because it indicates a tremendous upsurge 
in interest in the Society and in its work. I may say that plans have been 
made to continue our efforts to increase our membership during the coming 
months. We should congratulate ourselves upon this happy development. 

Another outstanding event of the year was the development of our 
magazine Horticulture. Gardeners are of all people the most conserva- 
tive persons. It was evident a year ago that it was unwise to publish Horti- 
culture twice a month and the decision was made at about that time to 
put it on a monthly basis. As of January first, we began publishing the 
magazine as a monthly, taking great pains to enlarge the magazine and to 
add to its interest and value in every way possible. The magazine now has 
taken its place as a thoroughly modern and up-to-date garden magazine. 

In carrying out the work of the Society, lectures play an important part. 
During the war, we were compelled by circumstances to stop all such 
activities. However, last Spring, as you all know, we did begin this work 
with a series of four lectures designed to help veterans and other new gar- 
deners in developing new home plantings. The success of this series en- 
couraged us to launch another series this Spring, a series which is now 
largely completed. 

I am pleased to announce that during the year we received the bequest 
of $50,000.00 made to the Society by Miss Louisa Case. We also received 
$1,000.00 which was bequeathed to the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 

35 



36 ANNUAL MEETING 

ciety by Adeline B. Gill. Both of these bequests have been set up as per- 
manent funds. The Society is deeply grateful for the interest and generosity 
of these donors. 

There was $4,581.78 added to the Greater Endowment Fund during the 
year. This represents pledges made previouslj" and were received in 1947. 

During 1947, your Society'' staged thirteen flower shows. This was a most 
ambitious program and severely taxed our resources and staflF. The public 
received them very well and from that point of view they were entirely 
satisfactory, constituting a most remarkable and praiseworthy contribu- 
tion to the advancement of horticulture. 

Once again, the New England Spring Flower Show held at Mechanics 
Building, March 15-20, was a conspicuous success. I think I can say that 
ours was the most successful of all the large shows held m the country this 
year. Because of economic conditions, our attendance was down sHghtly 
from that of the previous year. However, an increase in the price of ad- 
mission balanced that loss. Reports from other cities indicate that losses 
there ran to as much as a third. 

As j^ou know, during the war it was almost impossible for us to undertake 
any repairs to the building. Last year we began making such repairs as were 
vitally necessary and this year we continued the process, adding some 
work which was permissible because of the improved financial condition 
of our Society. For example, all of the floors of the building have been 
completely refinished. This was necessary because they were badly worn. 
We had the walls and ceilings on the second floor repainted and I may say 
that the interior of the building is now in first-class condition. We plan to 
undertake some of the necessary work on the exterior as circumstances 
permit. In particular, we need to do some repointing and some exterior 
painting. We also installed a switch in the lecture room which enables us to 
control the fights from a single p>oint rather than from several as was the 
case in the past. 

In this work of renovation, we made another outstanding accomplish- 
ment. As you know, our portrait gallery of presidents of the Society com- 
prises one of our most valuable possessions. Some of these portraits are of 
considerable merit and value. During the years, they have naturally de- 
teriorated somewhat and we have long desired to renovate them. During 
1947, we were financiaUy able to begin this work at last. Ten of the por- 
traits which were in the poorest condition were renovated. We plan to do 
ten more in 1948 and to continue the program into 1950 and thus preserve 
these priceless paintings. 

Our library has continued to grow and may now be described as one of 
the greatest horticultural libraries in the world, wdth about 30,000 volumes 
easily accessible. We are in a position to offer to all gardeners just about all 
the horticultural information that is available in print anywhere. The 
Library Committee will, I am sure, report in detail upon the library's ac- 
complishments and needs. I think, however, I should say that all of the 
books of Albert C. Burrage, which were wiUed to us tentatively at the time 
of his death, are now in our possession. We are to be congratulated upon 
the ownership of so many valuable books. 



ANNUAL MEETING 37 

As to the future of the Society, I think I express the opinion of all our 
Trustees and officers when I say that we are in a most excellent position. 
While there is much to be done and while a great deal of hard work remains 
for us all, I think we may confidently look forward to continuous growth 
in our membership and in continued development of facilities to give to 
New England — indeed, to all the United States — the very best horti- 
cultural service possible. 

I understand that there are now about 20,000,000 gardeners in the 
United States. I am told that the number is constantly increasing, that 
gardening is becoming one of the most popular and important functions of 
the American people. If this be so, if we are to garden as a nation, bigger 
and better than before, our Society being the largest and most important in 
the country has a wonderful opportunity for horticultural service. I am sure 
that we are all pleased at this situation and I am equally sure that we are 
all prepared to do whatever is necessary during the coming year and the 
years ahead to fulfill the purpose of our founders, the advancement of 
horticulture. 

John S. Ames 
President 



r^eport of the S^ecfeiaru 



As the president has just reported, the Society was very fortunate during 
the past 12 months in having an unprecedented increase in membership. 
Our membership today is approximately 11,000, which is a most health}^ 
and encouraging indication of the well being of our Society and of its 
prospects for the future. This increase was due in large part to an active 
campaign sustained over a period of months. Since we believe that a large 
membership is necessary for our effectiveness, we plan to continue this 
effort during the months ahead. 

In our opinion, there is a very large field for the services which this 
Society has to offer. When we consider that within the metropolitan area 
of Boston there are perhaps two and a haff million people and that at least 
10 per cent of them are gardeners, according to the national ratio, it is 
evident that we have a great opportunity for service. In addition to the 
Greater Boston area, this Society serves all of New England and most of 
the United States. You may be interested to know that we have members 
in all but four of the states. 

It is my desire to report in more detail upon Horticulture than did 
our president. He has outlined the difficulties and problems we faced in 
converting from 20 to 12 issues a year. I should like to emphasize the fact 
that this change was made as of January first without any difficulty. In 
fact, of our 40,000 subscribers, I do not recall a single serious complaint, 
and not more than half a dozen people expressed themselves as being 
disappointed in having fewer issues. Practically everybody from whom we 
heard expressed themselves as being pleased with the change. This may be 
due principally to the fact that we worked to make the new Horticulture 
a larger and better magazine in every way possible. For instance, we have 



38 ANNUAL MEETING 

obtained a nationwide staff of contributors who bring authority and 
points of view which inevitably make the magazine more interesting, and 
we are now able to use better paper, better illustrations and better printing. 
We know that Horticultuke, now only in its fifth month of this new form, 
is far from perfect, if it is ever possible for a magazine to be perfect. How- 
ever, we are constantly alert to fiind ways and means for making it better 
and I assure you that Horticulture will continue to improve in the 
months to come. 

A detailed financial report will be given later by our treasurer. I think 
it is proper for me to say at this time that we went through the year with- 
out a deficit. This is due, I believe, in large part, to the verv' careful financial 
management which is exercised by all your officers. Nothing was over- 
looked to make sure that, as far as possible, full value w^as received for 
every expenditure. 

In regard to our flower shows, I feel we had a very successful and satis- 
factory year. An unusual development was the fact that the Society at 
three of its shows was host to three national horticultural organizations. 
These were the American Delphinium Society, the American Peony So- 
ciety, and the Chrysanthemum Society of America. During the past I'i 
months, our Society also coop>erated with many horticultural and related 
organizations, such as the American Carnation Society and the North- 
eastern Florists' Association. I should also like to add that the Society was 
instrumental in the foundation last July of the North American Lily 
Society, a group from which I am sure the country is going to hear a great 
deal in the future, since lilies are becoming more popular and important. 

In regard to our show schedule, we had 13 exhibitions in 1947. In the 
opinion of our Exhibition Committee and officers, this was too many. It 
made heavy demands upon the Society's finances in the provision of 
prizes and in the payment of expenses, and it also kept our staff so busy 
that there was no time for needed and necessary repairs to the building. 
For this reason, during 1948, we have eliminated three shows by combining 
several into one. AVe believe that our 1948 schedule of ten shows will be 
entirely adequate as well as a substantial financial saving. 

In the matter of the Society's books, I am sorry to report that "The 
Gardener's Travel Book" will probably not appear this year. Mr. Farring- 
ton completed the work on this book before his retirement, but the Oxford 
Press, who have accepted it for publication, were unable to fit it into 
their schedule. We believe that it will be published in 1949. 

As you know, we purchased the copyright to "Manning's Plant Buyer's 
Guide." We are revising this book and we are working on the preparation 
of the manuscript, which wall cover the entire countrv' and prove of great 
value to both the trade and gardeners everywhere. This book we antic- 
ipate will be ready for publication early next year. 

The Society's book sales were continued but on a smaller scale, since it 
was determined that we were justified only in continuing them as a service 
to members and not as a commercial venture. 

During the year, it was my privilege as secretary to maintain direct 
and active relations with various horticultural and related organizations. 



ANNUAL MEETING 39 

We have maintained close touch with both the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society and the Horticultural Society of New York. In addition, I at- 
tended the Second Annual Conference of the American Horticultural 
Council, both as a representative of this Society and as a speaker. My 
subject was ''Horticultural Awards." The paper is to be published in an 
early bulletin of the Council. I was also elected secretary of the Council at 
that meeting. 

Last Spring, I represented the Society in Washington at a hearing on the 
proposed changes in the quarantine laws governing the importation of 
bulbs. It was decided that the Society should take a position in opposition 
to the proposed change and I presented the Society's point of view before 
the congressional coipmittee. 

At the time of the International Spring Flower Show held in New York, 
I represented President Ames at a dinner given by the Horticultural 
Society of New York. It was my privilege to present our exhibition gold 
medals to Mr. L. C. Bobbink of the firm of Bobbink & Atkins for having 
the best garden in the 1947 New York Show, and to Mr. Don Roehrs, to 
whom the medal was awarded this year for the best garden in the Show. 

Also as a representative of the Society, I attended an organization 
meeting of the National Tulip Society and was appointed a director for 
that organization's District 1. 

Last Spring, I also attended a meeting of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Founda- 
tion at Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, for the purpose of selecting a candidate 
for the Arthur Hoyt Scott Medal, which is given for outstanding service to 
horticulture. The medal was awarded to Professor Saunders, the famous 
peony hybridizer. 

President Ames and your Secretary were invited by the Board of 
Trustees of Cornell University to attend a dinner given on April 29 in 
honor of Dr. Liberty Hyde Bailey, who recently observed the ninetieth 
anniversary of his birth. Unfortunately, Mr. Ames had a previous engage- 
ment, so it became my privilege to attend. It was an experience I shall 
always remember. In fact, I consider it one of the highlights of my entire 
horticultural career. In attendance were botanists and horticulturists from 
all over the country. Dr. E. D. Merrill, one of our own Trustees, repre- 
sented Harvard University. 

I may say here that the Society was also represented from time to time 
by our editor, Mr. William H. Clark. For example, he attended the recent 
annual convention of the Men's Garden Clubs of America and he also 
represented us at the March luncheon meeting of the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society at the time of their Spring Flower Show. 

It is now my sad duty to report the death during the year of Mr. William 
Wolcott. Mr. Wolcott was a Trustee of the Society for many years and 
devoted himself in various capacities to promoting its welfare. He was the 
third generation of his family to be active in the Society and his loss is 
keenly felt. 

During the year, Mr. Q. A. Shaw McKean found it necessary to resign 
as a Trustee because of a change of residence. He was a member of one of 
our important committees and his resignation was a great loss. 



40 ANNUAL MEETING 

During the past few months, the Society experimented with its own 
radio program as an educational feature. Mr. Seth L. Kelsey of East 
Boxford, a member of the Society for many years, had p^e^^ously broad- 
cast garden programs with the cooperation of the Society over Station 
"NVHDH and had built up a large following. Early in the j^ear, Mr. Kelsey 
proposed that the Society take over this program. Since the station was 
willing to contribute its time, the Board of Trustees decided to take over 
the program for a period of six months. 

For many years, it has been the poHcy of the Society to serve the general 
pubhc by means of a series of lectures. As was the case last Spring when 
we first resumed this activity following the war, we continued it again this 
Spring, beginning with a lecture by John Nash Ott, Jr., who dehvered a 
magnificently illustrated talk on flower behavior and various aspects of 
horticulture. Vie are dehghted to report that this lecture enjoyed the 
largest attendance of any the Society has ever sponsored. It was necessary 
for Mr. Ott to repeat his lecture at the conclusion of his first appearance, 
and even then, some people were turned away. 

Another lecture was one by Dr. Rolf Singer of Harvard University, who 
presented the first of what we hope to be an annual series on mushrooms. 
Our popular lecture program this Spring includes a series of four: "Grow 
Your Own Food," by Professor Paul Dempsey of the Waltham Field 
Station; "How to Choose Your Plants," by Seth Kelsey, East Boxford; 
"Putting Plants in Their Places," by Miss Brenda Newton of our own 
staff; and "Garden Pests," by Professor W. D. AATiitcomb of the ^yaltham 
Field Station. 

This series was planned as a contribution toward the advancement of 
the Freedom Garden movement which is being promoted throughout the 
country. The Society has consistently cooperated with other agencies, 
both pubhc and private, in promoting Freedom Gardens. 

In conclusion, I should like to express my deep appreciation for the 
many kindnesses and excellent support I have received from the men and 
women with whom I have worked during the past year. I look forward in 
the year to come to enjoying the same splendid cooperation. We are 
beginning an era in the history of our Society which holds for us the 
promise of both greatly increased activity and of greath* enlarged services. 
What the future can hold for us no one knows, but we may all be assured 
that this Society, now preeminent in America in its field, has both the 
abihty and the equipment to make itself an integral part of the forthcom- 
ing development of horticulture and gardening in America. 

Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 

r^eport of tne L^ommlHee on C^xniolHond 

I am happy to report a most successful year in the annals of this Society 
so far as the financial and other operations of this committee are concerned. 
In addition to a very successful Sprmg Flower Show held in the Mechanics 
Building, 12 smaller exhibitions were staged in Horticultural Hall. The 



ANNUAL'MEETING 41 

attendance at these smaller shows was about average. We have long hoped 
that the attendance at the Autumn Show could be increased to such a 
point that it would be self-supporting, since this and the Spring Show are 
the only ones to which admission is charged. Last year the attendance 
was 7,805, but, as usual, the expenses exceeded the receipts, the deficit 
being $2,179,78. The Committee has decided not to charge any admission 
to this exhibition in 1948, though its standard of quality will be kept up 
to that of former years. 

Time and space do not permit me to go into details regarding the various 
smaller exhibitions. I mention briefly that the Lily Show was an outstand- 
ing event. The presence of lily enthusiasts from all parts of the country 
was responsible for a larger attendance than at any previous lily show, 
and resulted in the formation of the North American Lily Society. Partic- 
ularly worthy of mention also was the Delphinium exhibition staged by 
the American Delphinium Society in cooperation w^ith the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society. One section of the hall was assigned to the New 
England Rose Society, the two groups of plants making an ideal combina- 
tion. The Autumn Show featuring greenhouse chrysanthemums was 
considered by many visitors to be the finest Chrysanthemum exhibit 
staged in Horticultural Hall in many years. 

The results of the recent Spring Show in Mechanics Building exceeded 
the expectations of both the Exhibitions Committee and the officers of the 
Society. At this show the Exhibition Committee, working through the 
Show Manager, is expected to make a minimum profit, for income from 
this source is very important to the Society. The Committee is informed 
in advance of the amount needed for budgetary purposes. We were frankly 
worried by the situation as it developed, because we had little or no control 
over various factors. The exhibit was a particularly expensive one to stage 
because of the large amount of special construction involved, and, of 
course, radically increased labor costs, to say nothing of the increase in 
the cost of supplies, equipment, rental of Mechanics Building, and other 
charges. Furthermore, nearly all of the exhibits in Grand Hall were 
developed at the expense of the Horticultural Society itself, although the 
tulip bulbs were supplied gratis by the Dutch Tulip Growers Association. 
Based on our experience in 1947 the tentative budget for the 1948 show 
was placed at $100,000.00, but it soon became evident that this amount 
would be exceeded by some thousands of dollars. In brief, the 1948 exhibi- 
tion was the most expensive one we have ever staged in the Mechanics 
Building, which means, of course, the most expensive in the history of our 
shows. By the middle of the week, however, it became evident from the 
daily attendance records that we need no longer worry about the financial 
results. Our total attendance in 1947 was 126,000, and that of this year 
115,000, a decrease of about nine per cent. However, this decrease in total 
attendance w^as not reflected in the profits because of the slight increase in 
the price of admission and because of increased income from the sale of 
trade space and certain other sources. 

All of you saw the exhibition, so it does not seem necessary at this time 
to discuss other than its financial aspects. The profits of the Spring Show 



42 ANNUAL MEETING 

not only covered the amount that the officers of the Society had set as a 
minimum goal in order to enable them to keep the total budget of the 
Society in balance for the fiscal year, but actually greatly exceeded the 
amount we were requested to provide. While the books are not finally 
closed, it is now apparent that the total profit in 1948 will equal or even 
slightly exceed that of the extraordinarily successful year 1946, when the 
total profit broke all records, being $51,860.41. Thus the Spring Show 
profits not only contribute very materially to the operation of the other 
departments of the Society, mcluding all of the smaller exhibitions, but 
the trustees may find it possible at the end of the year to add a certain 
amount to the Flower Show reserve fund. 

An innovation in connection with the Spring Show has been the setting 
up of a separate Flower Show Account, with a complete set of books being 
maintained solely for exhibition matters. Thus it is now possible for the 
first time for the Exhibitions Committee to determine at any time the 
exact financial status of the Flower Show Department. I camiot but feel 
that the arrangements developed in Boston are admirable from every 
standpoint in that, unlike the situation in other eastern cities where large 
spring flower shows are held, with us all profits from operations accrue 
to the Societj" itself. We realize, of course, that if for any reason our 
Spring Show did not prove to be a financial success, the Society would have 
to cover the deficit, and that it would have to reduce its other activities 
accordingly. This is the reason why the Flower Show Reserve Fund was 
originally established as a safeguard against possible contingencies, and 
again is the reason why we urge that whenever excess profits are available, 
additions be made to the established reserve fund. The exhibitions which 
the Committee plans and supervises, working through the Show Manager, 
cannot be allowed to fall below certain standards, and yet at the same time 
it should be realized that the Committee makes a very serious attempt to 
operate on a sound financial basis, being constantly on guard against 
extraordinary expenditures. 

As chairman of the Exhibitions Committee, and for that Committee, I 
wish to express sincere appreciation for the cooperation we have had from 
the Committee on Prizes, from the officials of the Society, from its mem- 
bers, and especially from the numerous individuals who have staged 
exhibits of one tjpe or another. Without the full cooperation of those 
individuals and firms it would, of course, be impossible for the Society to 
operate on such an extensive scale. 

We wish to acknowledge our special appreciation of the services rendered 
by Mr. Egbert Hans and Mr. Lommerse, who were to a large extent 
responsible for developing Grand Hall into "Tulip Time." I also desire to 
mention the Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts and the newly 
organized Women's Exhibitions Committee of the Society for the as- 
sistance rendered in making our 1948 Spring Show so successful. Partic- 
ularly worthy of mention also were the exhibits staged by the New 
England Carnation Growers Association and Roses Incorporated. I regret 
that space and time limitations are such that I cannot go more into detail 
regarding these exhibits. • 



ANNUAL MEETING 43 

^^ If any member of the Society has constructive ideas to offer to our 
committee, or if he has criticisms, his ideas and criticisms will be wel- 
comed. We are open-minded and appreciate ideas which may not have 
occurred to us. We have proved that through cooperation we can, year 
after year, stage extensive and attractive exhibitions which not only give 
real pleasure to the many thousands of individuals who attend them, but 
whicli, also, have developed into one of the most important sources of 
income of the Society. But for the annual profits of the Spring Show, an 
event which in Boston has certainly "arrived," as the saying goes, the 
operations and services of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society as a 
whole would, of necessity, have to be curtailed. 

I personally extend my sincere thanks to all members of the Exhibitions 
Committee for their regular attendance at its numerous meetings, for the 
suggestions they have offered, and for their loyalty to the Society. One 
and all are motivated by the same aspirations, to stage excellent shows, 
to improve from year to year, to keep expenses to a minimum, and to operate 
on such a basis that there will be a good financial return to the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society. After all, this is your society, and you all 
unquestionably realize that such an organization as this simply does not 
run itself. To stage a successful Spring Flower Show involves a vast amount 
of detailed planning; as soon as one great show is dismantled, the Exhibi- 
tions Committee immediately commences to plan for the next one, a year 

hence. 

E. D. Merrill 
Chairman 

r\eport of tne L^ommlHee on f-^rlzed 

During the past year, the Society held a total of 13 Flower Shows. At 
12 of these, the Committee on Prizes superintended the judging. At the 
Exhibition of the Products of Children's Gardens, judging was done by 
a special committee under the efficient direction of Mr. Samuel Goddard. 

In our constant attempt to arrive at fair and just verdicts, to which 
every exhibitor is assuredly entitled, the availability of competent judges 
is held to be of the utmost importance. 

It is the custom of the Committee on Prizes to meet well in advance of 
each of the larger Shows and from a card catalog of specialists select judges 
to work under the supervision of the Committee on Prizes. Great care 
has been taken to give these judges full instructions as to scaling exhibits , 
to make recommendations for medals and the Society's certificates; 
to record over their individual signatures worth-while comments of ap- 
probation or of defects; to work by the Rule Book; and to confer with the 
Committee on Prizes regarding any matters of marked disagreement or 
doubtful interpretation. 

Unfortunately, judging is not an exact science. With many factors 
involved, each exhibit really becomes an intelligence test for the judges. 
Where two or more exhibits are in competition, there may be, in fact 



44 ANNUAL MEETING 

always is, a great difference with respect to general character, plant ma- 
terial, the number of problems the exhibitor has had to meet. In just 
these cases, wide variations occasionally occur in the appraisals recorded 
by different sets of judges. 

In the last analysis, it is the duty of the Committee on Prizes to check 
up on each of these scalings and harmonize these differences. 

During the past year, several of these differences of opinion have oc- 
curred and have been embarrassing. 

Through the loss of one of the regular members of the Committee — 
whose place was not filled by a regular appointee — several occasions 
occurred where, even in the Prize Committee, split decisions resulted. 
This should be ample proof that any Committee on Prizes should consist 
of an uneven number of members. Each member should be a man of 
considerable experience, absolutely impartial, capable of independent 
opinion, thoroughly familiar with the Rule Book, and willing to consider 
with an open mind the reasons advanced by other members of the Com- 
mittee at variance with his own. 

If special judges fail to follow instructions by omitting to scale in- 
dependently, by omitting comments as to reasons for wide discrepancies 
in individual scaling or by leaving the premises before their verdicts have 
been considered by the Committee on Prizes — in such occasional in- 
stances, they are not only of no help but actually occasion embarrassment 
for the Committee. 

It is satisfactory to report that our card catalog of plants which have 
received the Society's Certificates is in process of being put into such 
shape that it will serve as a permanent record. By being readily available, 
it will be of definite assistance to the Committee whenever a new intro- 
duction is under consideration for recognition. 

Such cards should bear the name of the originator, the name of the 
plant, its pedigree, its degree of hardiness, a reasonably exact description 
in acceptable terminology and where color is concerned, once again I 
would recommend that the Massachusetts Horticultural Society adopt as 
its official color chart the comprehensive Color Chart of the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society. 

Dr. George O. Clark 
Chairman 

fKeport of lite C^ommUiee on L^nUaren & LjuraenS 

According to Mr. Daniel O'Brien, who is in charge of the school garden 
program in the Boston public schools, almost as many gardens were 
maintained by the children last year as during the War when the Victory 
Garden program was in progress. This is an encouraging trend and we all 
know that there is no healthier occupation than gardening, especially for 
children. Many of these youngsters will become our future horticulturists. 
Just to keep these children occupied is another important value as it 
keeps them off the streets and in this way has a tendency to reduce child 



ANNUAL MEETING 45 

delinquency. This point is recognized by the Boy Scouts of America who 
will this Spring develop an extensive garden program for Boy Scouts all 
over the United States. It is our duty as citizens to do everything possible 
to encourage children to garden. 

The Children's Show sponsored by our Society is the largest and most 
important exhibition of its kind in the coimtry. Mr. Henry G. Wendler of 
the Boston Public Schools told me that he found this fact is being recog- 
nized from his conversations with visitors from three States including a 
man from Florida and a number of teachers from the New York School 
Department. They were high in their praise, he said, for the type of show 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was staging for the children 
of Massachusetts. 

The number of entries at the Children's Show last year were not quite 
as numerous as in former years. This was due to the fact that a severe 
electrical storm the afternoon and evening before the Show interfered with 
the harvesting of the vegetables and the cutting of the flowers. In many 
cases the flowers that the children were planning to bring into the Show 
were damaged to such an extent that they were not suitable for show pur- 
poses. The number of entries in the School and Home Garden Section 
totalled 682 and in the 4-H Club section 229, making a total of 911. In 
addition there were 50 entries in the Canned Fruit and Vegetable Section. 

The quality of the vegetables was extremely high for a Children's Show. 
Each year more attention is being given to the arrangement of the mate- 
rial. A great deal of overcrowding has been eliminated, and in the school 
garden exhibits the backgrounds were of flowers which adds interest to 
the individual exhibits. A number of school garden exhibits compared 
favorably with those staged by professionals in other shows. 

For a number of years the Committee has been trying to encourage 
children from surrounding communities to participate, and this ground 
work is beginning to bring results, as we had more exhibits from outlying 
districts than we ever had before. The Committee hopes that the mem- 
bers of the Society, as well as the Garden Clubs, will continue to urge the 
children in their commimities to participate in the Children's Show. I 
would like to state again that any child under 18 years of age from any 
part of New England is eligible. 

At the close of the Show^ the children again presented the vegetables, 
fruits, and flowers on exhibition to the Fruit and Flower Mission. Miss 
Ethel E. Hudson, the executive secretary of this organization, was elated 
over the generous amount and the quality of the material. The vegetables, 
fruits and flowers were sent to hospitals, homes for aged women, and other 
organizations on the list of the Fruit and Flower Mission. The vegetables 
were especially welcome because of the prevailing high prices. 

Unfortunately, your chairman and Mr. Daniel O'Brien, the second mem- 
ber of the Committee, were not able to take an active part in the prepara- 
tion of the Show because of illness. However, Mr. Henry G. Wendler, Mr. 
O'Brien's assistant, was untiring in his efforts in planning and staging the 
Show. Mrs. Henry Tudor gave the Committee many valuable suggestions 
and attended the Show to advise and assist Mr. Wendler. The chairman of 



46 ANNUAL IMEETING 

the Committee extends his thanks to Mr. Henry G. Wendler and to Mrs. 
Tudor, as well as to Mr. Earle Xodine who as usual staged a marvelous 
exhibit with his 4-H Club boys and girls. 

S. J. GODDARD 

Chairman 

Keport of the cJLioraru L^ommlUee 

Last year this Committee reported that use of the library had increased 
by 25 per cent. The gain was e\'idently the beginning of a new post-war 
interest in gardening, for this increase has persisted. More than 5000 books 
were borrowed, and 1697 packages were mailed to readers in other parts of 
the country. More members are bringing their gardening problems by 
personal call, telephone, and letter. A cordial invitation is extended to all 
members to visit the library if they can, and to make use of its services by 
mail, wherever they live. A selected catalogue is sent to every member 
when he joins, and the experts on the staff will be glad to answer questions. 

The largest stimulus has come through the Spring Flower Show, where 
the information booth is in charge of the library staff. Experience showed 
that visitors wanted gardening information as well as facts about the Show. 
A good selection of books from the hbrary helps to further this work, and 
consignments of new books for sale have been jxjpular and profitable. Last 
year and this year members of the staffs of the Arnold Arboretum and the 
AValtham Field Station have given a morning, an afternoon or an evening 
at the booth as consultants, and we thank them for their interest and help. 

Four hundred and ninety-five volumes were added to the collection by 
gift, purchase and binding, bringing the total number of bound volumes 
up to 29,09L Another large collection has just been received from the A. C. 
Burrage estate. Ours is by far the largest horticultural library in America. 

A large collection of duphcate books was put on sale this Spring. Lists 
were sent to other scientific libraries, and sales have been good. 

E. D. Merrill 
Chairman 



ANNUAL MEETING 47 



IKeport of the ^reaAurer 



STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION ON 
December 31, 1947 

ASSETS 

Cash in Banks and on hand $ 32,039.32 

Treasurer: in Bank $ 22,187. 83 

Bursar: In Bank 9,844 . 77 

On Hand 6.72 

$ 32,039 32 

Investments valued at Book value $ 777,169.50 

Capital Assets 592,586 . 38 

Real Estate $498,564 . 63 

Improvements and Additions to Building 47,441 . 28 
Library 46,580.47 

$592,586.38 

Deferred Charge: 

Spring Show, 1948 1,254.73 

$1,403,049.93 
LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL FUNDS 

Liabilities : Accounts Payable $ 67 1 . 50 

Sundry Funds 579,047. 96 

Special Uses: 

Principal $167,326.62 

Unexpended Income. . . 10,776.20 $178,102.82 

General Uses : 

Principal 400,945.14 

$579,047 . 96 

Greater Endowment Fund 35,460. 16 

Balance January 1, 1947 $ 30,878.38 

Net Addition, 1947 4,581.78 

$ 35,460.16 

Life Membership Fees 29,542.00 

Mount Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053.52 

Show Insurance Fund 53,177. 93 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 81,929. 72 

Balance, January 1, 1947 $ 70,514 . 21 

Add : Net Profit on Sale of Securities .. . 11,415.51 

$ 81,929.72 

Surplus (Earned) 3,642. 44 

Balance, January 1, 1947 $ 

Transferred from Profit and Loss 3,642 . 44 

$ 3,642.44 

$1,403,049.93 



48 ANNUAL MEETING 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

INCOME 

1947 1946 

Income from investments $ 38,691 . 81 $ 3^2,593 . 92 

Membership fees 15,702.69 15,163.00 

Rentals 11,507.87 6,742.43 

Spring Show 75,158.67 78,250.54 

Autumn Show 1,087 86 

Horticulture 160.31 9,185.26 

Other Receipts 3,680.88 3,087 . 69 

$145,669.47 $145,022.84 
EXPENDITURES 

Building Expense $ 32,280.46 $ 21,790.05 

Library Expense 13,869.46 11,302.08 

Oflfice and General Salaries and Expenses. . . 52,351.14 52,049.89 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expense 3,647.85 8,586.16 

Lectures paid from General Funds 112.43 

Priaes, Medals and Certificates paid from 

General Funds 7,638.75 4,521.96 

Prizes, Medals and Certificates paid from 

Spring Show 28,438.00 24,358.36 

Medals, Lectures, etc. Paid from Restricted 

Funds 1,884.00 2,880.50 

Awards at Shows paid from Restricted Funds 2,735 . 87 1,876 . 43 

Other Payments 100.00 167.50 

$143,057 96 $127,532 93 
Excess of Income over Expenditures, All 

Funds $ 2,611.51 17,489.91 

Deduct: Difference between current income 

additions and current expenses charged on 

Restricted Funds 1,030.93 36.21 

Excess of Income over Expenditures, Gen- 
eral Funds $ 3,642.44 $ 17,526.12 

Net Transfer to Show Insurance Fund from 

Sprmg Show Income, 1946 12,558.23 

Balance of Income $ 3,642.44 $ 4,967.89 

Walter Hunnewell 
Treasurer 

RESULT OF THE BALLOTING 

At 4 :O0 o'clock the polls were closed, 74 votes having been cast, and the 
following p>ersons were declared elected : 
President: John S. Ames. 
Vice President: Dr. George O. Clark. 

Trustees: (For three years) George B. Cabot, Walter Hunnewell, 
Seth L. Kelsey, Mrs. Willlajh A. Parker and Mrs. 
Roger Warner. 
Trustee: (For one year) John Chandler, 



n 



ecroloau 



A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society whose 
deaths were reported during the year ending May 1, 1948. 



Mrs. Leonard Ahl 
Mrs. Charles F. Aldrich 
Mr. Frederick W. Austin 
Mrs. Samuel G. Babcock 
Mr. James S. Bache 
Miss Chloe E. Bachelor 
Miss S. Louise Baker 
Mrs. Charles B, Barnes 
Miss Elizabeth C. Barry 
Mrs. Louise E. Bennett 
Mrs. Stillman A. Benway 
Mrs. Susie B. Black 
Mrs. Henry G. Bradlee 
Mr. Luther A. Breck 
Mrs. Edmund G. Buckner 
Mr. Victor Bushman 
Miss A. Linda Campbell 
Mr. William H. Cann 
Miss Alice A. Carter 
Mr. William C. Carter 
Mrs. Dexter H. Chamberlain 
Miss Katharine F. Cody 
Mr. William R. Cordingley 
Miss Marie A. Crane 
Mrs. George U. Crocker 
Mrs. H. Stanley Crysler 
Mr. Alex Cumming 
Mrs. Emily Curbie 
Mrs. H. D. Delano 
Mr, Walter W. Dennis 
Mrs. John O. DeWolf 
Mr. Scott T. Doten 
Miss Luella M. Eaton 
Mrs. Ralph C. Estes 
Miss Katharine French 
Miss Louise Gadoury 
Mr. Jesse E. Grant 
Mrs. Alice R. Hartshorn 
Mrs. Arthur C. Harvey 
Mr. Hammond V. Hayes 
Mr. Frank L. Haynes 
Miss Helen W. Holmes 
Miss Cora C. Holt 
Mrs. William E. Holtham 
Mr. Charles Hoyer 
Mr. Henry V. Hubbard 
Mrs. Joshua C. Hubbard 
Miss Sarah E. Jacobs 
Mr. William A. Jeffries 
Mr. C. B. Johnson 
Mr. Fred D. Jordan 
Mr. Myron L. Keith 
Mr. Herbert J. Kellaway 
Mrs. Nellie S. Kenny 
Mrs. Willard Kent 
Miss Martha G. Kimball 



Mrs. Tarrant P. King 

Mr. Harry B. Livermore 

Mr. Alfred I. Merigold 

Mrs. Winthrop N. Messenger 

Mr. James L. Miller 

Mr. George W. Mitton 

Mr. E. Francis Naugler 

Miss Alvena C. Newhall 

Mrs. Edith C. Nickerson 

Mr. Robert N. Nye 

Miss Hilda L. Olson 

Mr. John R. Palmer 

Mr. Walter H. Parker 

Mr. M. Sumner Perkins 

Mrs. Sarah C. Pierce 

Mr. Myron D. Place 

Mrs. C. Griggs Plant 

Mr. Fred H. Poore 

Mr. Albert H. Poulton 

Mr. Charles D. Pray 

Mr. William L. Puffer 

Mrs. Ellen M. A. Putnam 

Mrs. Arthur C. Raymond 

Mr. Ralph W. Reynolds 

Mr. Dexter M. Rogers 

Mr. John J. Rourke 

Mrs. Duncan D. Russell 

Mr. James Scott 

Mrs. Harry R. Sinclair 

Mrs. James F. Smithwick 

Mrs. Marion C. Smyth 

Mrs. William A. Spalding 

Mr. Harry F. Stimpson 

Mrs. Eldie Stone 

Miss Jennie Sullivan 

Mr. Samuel S. Symmes 

Mrs. Edmund M. Taft 

Mrs. Robert W. Taft 

I>R. Theodore L. Terry 

Mr. Hermann Thiemann 

Mrs. Isaac Rand Thomas 

Dr. Charles H. Tozier 

Miss Bertha H. Vaughan 

Mr. Charles F. Wallace 

Mr. Bentley W. Warren 

Mrs. William M. Wheeler 

Mrs. North Whitehead 

Mrs. George A. Whitney 

Mrs. Parker W. Whittemore 

Mr. Albert R. Whittier 

Mr. Joseph A. Winsock 

Mr. William Prescott Wolcott 

Mr. Albert Wollrath 

Mr. Louis F. Wood 

Mr. Rocco Zeparo 



49 



^J^onoraru IHIlentb 



¥ 



JemberA 



1942 Lord Aberconway, North Wales, England 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Walter D. Brownell, Little Compton, Rhode Island 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 A. T. De L\ Mare, New York, New York 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Arthur Herrington, Madison, New Jersey 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Fred H. Howard, Montebello, California 

1942 Colonel R. H. Montgomery, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law^ Olmsted, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. Alfred Rehder, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1942 Dr. a. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 NoRiL^-N Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C, J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Edward I. Farrington, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1943 Jens Jensen, Ellison Bay, Wisconsin 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. O. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 

1945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw', Amherst, Massachusetts 

1945 Theodore Wirth, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Dr. a. F. Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 

1947 James J. Hurley, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1947 Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1948 Ernest Borowski, Norwood, Massachusetts 
1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 
1948 John L. Russell, Dedham, Massachusetts 
1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

50 



(^orredjjonclina rl/ lemberS 

1925 Rudolph D. Anstead, Bournemouth, England 

1889 Dr. L. H. Bailey, Ithaca, New York 

1911 W. J. Beax, 2 Mortlake Road, Kew, England 

1918 M. Desire Bois, Paris, France 

1925 I. H. BuRKiLL, F.L.S., "Clova," Fetcham Park, Leatherhead, England 

1921 Fred J. Chittexdex, F.L.S., Vincent Square, Westminster, London, 

England 

1925 AYoox YorxG Chl-x, Sun Yat Sen University, Canton, South China 

1925 Hexry F. duPoxt, Winterthur, Delaware 

1925 Pierre S. duPoxt, Wilmington, Delaware 

1925 Charles C. Eley, M.A., F.L.S., Suffolk, England 

1925 George Eraser, Ucuelet, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada 

1925 W. G. Freemax, Esq., B.S.C., F.L.S., Imperial Institute, South Kensington, 

London, S. W. 7, England 

1918 Prof. X. E. Haxsex, Brookings, South Dakota 

1911 Prof, U. P. Hedrick, Geneva, New York 

1925 Prof. H. H. Hu, Fan Memorial Institute of Biology, Peking, China 

1925 Mrs, C. L. Hutchixsox, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 

1925 Charles W. Kxight, Oakdale, New York 

1921 C. E. Laxe-Poole, Canberra, Australia 

1925 C. C. Laxey, Rochester, New York 

1911 M. Emile Lemoixe, Nancy, France 

1925 Sir J. S. Maxwell, Bart, K.T., Pollok House, near Glasgow, Scotland 

1918 J. Horace McFarlaxd, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

1925 Mrs. William Mercer, Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

1925 Dr. Kixgo Mitabe, Imperial University, Sepparo, Japan 

1898 Sir Frederick W, Moore, F.L.S., Willbrook House, Rathfarnham Co., 

Dublin, Ireland 

1918 Dr. George T. Moore, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Missouri 

1925 F. Clevelaxd Morgax', Montreal, Quebec, Canada 

1925 M. L. Parde, Nogent-sur-Vernisson (Loiret), France 

1925 I. B. PoLE-EvAXs, C.M.G., Chief of Division and Director, Botanical Survey, 

Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa 

1906 Sir David Praix, F.R.S., C.M.G., F.L.S., Warlingham, Surrey, England 

1925 Miss Isabella Prestox, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

1925 Johaxtstes Rafx, Skovfrokontoret, Copenhagen, Denmark 

1906 Dr. Hexry N. Ridley, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., M.A., Kew, Surrey, England 

1925 Camillo Schxeider, c/o Gartenschonheit, Berlin- Westend, Germany 

1925 F. L. Skixtver, Dropmore, Manitoba, Canada 

1925 Sir William Wright Smith, F.L.S., Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, 

Scotland 

1893 Prof. Willl\m Trelease, Urbana, Illinois 

1925 Cyril T. White, Government Botanist, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia 

1921 GuRXEY WiLSOx, Secretary Royal Horticultural Society Orchid Committee, 

Vincent Square, London, S. W. 1, England 

1925 John C. Wister, Arthur Hoyt Scott Foundation, Swarthmore College, 

Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 

1925 Sir Chad Woodward, Bewdley, Worcestershire, England 

51 



^,Arn Jj^ncrecLSed C^ndowment 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society urgently requires additions 
to its endowment fund. Income has been markedly decreased because of 
the forced exchange of high interest bonds for those carrying a lower rate 
of interest. In addition, recent developments in the national economy have 
caused many substantial increases in operation costs. 

The Trustees are adverse to curtailing the Society's activities. In fact, 
there is a greater demand for the Society's services than ever before and the 
organization is endeavoring to meet this multiplying popular demand. 
Li addition to our many regular activities our program has been developed 
into various new fields of usefulness. The gratifying response to these new 
activities is tjpical of the opportunity confronting this Society. 

Without an increase in this Society's endowment, some of our work 
must be curtailed. This will be a great misfortune, not only because of 
consequent failure to meet the demands being made by the public but also 
because it will be the first negative action of the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society in its 120 years of the practice of its oflicial purpose: "the 
advancement of horticulture and kindred interests." 



52 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 



IT IS hoped by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that it 
will not be forgotten by members who find it expedient to make 
their wills. This Society's financial condition is sound and its 
investments are good, but the income from many of its investments 
has declined because of decreased retiums from its bond holdings. 
Expenses naturally have increased and more money is needed to 
extend the activities of the Society. 

The following form of bequest is suggested: 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum 

of. to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed. 



vHlTc,